Sunday, October 25

Culture

Con Bravura: A Night of Music and Legacy

Con Bravura: A Night of Music and Legacy

Culture
  THE MUSICAL excellence of the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters (AB Chorale) that withstood the test of time was celebrated during their 20th anniversary concert dubbed Con Bravura last June 19. The elegantly clad alumni and current members of AB Chorale demonstrated their group’s musical journey through an interesting contrast of old and new songs and the captivating unity of voices that seemed to wind around each other until they intertwined as one—creating music that is solid and fluid at the same time. The chorale’s rendition of Isang Linggong Pag-ibig was a remarkable performance. It added a contemporary twist to the Filipino classic as comical side comments adorned the popular lines of the song. While the aforementioned sent the audience giggling, the choir’s chilling pe
Philippine Independence: Are We Celebrating on the Right Day?

Philippine Independence: Are We Celebrating on the Right Day?

Culture
IN 1965, President Diosdado Macapagal signed Republic Act No. 4166, declaring June 12 as the official Philippine Independence Day. While it is commonplace for Filipinos to celebrate the country’s independence on June 12, confusion on the rightful date to celebrate the Independence Day  still remains. Was it Aug. 1 or Sept. 9 after several modifications? Or should it be celebrated every July 4—the same date its former colonizer celebrates its own? One of the most important days in our history changed dramatically over time. What actions in the past contributed to these changes? And do they make any difference? Emilio Aguinaldo: June 12, 1898 The Philippine Act of the Declaration of Independence or Acta de la Proclamacion de la Independencia del Pueblo Filipino, written by Ambro
Design Week Philippines 2016: A celebration of creativity in the walled city

Design Week Philippines 2016: A celebration of creativity in the walled city

Culture
LOST IN the beat of quality indie music, and entranced by gripping spoken word performances, the crowd sat in a cozy huddle and tuned in to various stories of life told through a one-of-a-kind fusion of music and poetry. Ex Vivo: From Beginning to End brought together some of the country’s most popular spoken word poetry groups: Ilustrados, White Wall Poetry, and Lakambini Poetry. Vibrant local bands such as Oswald Sleeps Tonight, Kissling, and Caffeine and Taurine also filled Intramuros with good music. The Spoken Word Poetry and Independent Music Festival held last April 16 at Maestranza Plaza, Intramuros, Manila, was part of Design Week Philippines, an annual celebration of design and creativity organized by Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions (CITEM). “[S
6 Takeaways From This Year’s Pasinaya Festival

6 Takeaways From This Year’s Pasinaya Festival

Culture
FOR 12 years and counting, the Pasinaya festival continues to showcase the unique and evolving Filipino creativity. Here are six remarkable performances during this year's festival held last Feb. 7 at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. 1) Ballet Philippines: Journey to the Pool Ballerinas immersed into a swim as they move in synchronized flips and strokes. Their powerful stunts transport the audience into a dive of underwater movements. The dancers’ swift and energetic performance navigates a spectator’s imagination. The “flippers” proved that ballets can create a captivating performance sans pointe shoes and tutus. 2) UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe: Facing Social Issues The Salinggawi interpreted the country’s social issues and its effects through dance. Their
Escaping the Humdrum in Lindslee’s Cliché Untitled

Escaping the Humdrum in Lindslee’s Cliché Untitled

Culture
JADED BY the monotony of exhibits that yield to imitative styles and concepts, esteemed abstract artist Lindslee probes the nature of contemporary art while presenting artists’ continued struggle to survive in a world where art’s value lies on price tags in his exhibit titled Cliché Untitled. Lindsey James Lee, known in the art scene as “Lindslee,” compared today’s realm of art to a “stagnant river.” “Nagsawa na lang ako sa kakatingin ng exhibits na pare-pareho,” he said, admitting that he could no longer identify the difference between the artworks and the artists’ styles because of how similar and predictable they were. The artist’s favorite, Pain Thing, is a framed canvas exploding with dull colors that attempt to overpower each other. The colored bubbles are connected to
Revisiting the Thomasian Life of Jose Rizal

Revisiting the Thomasian Life of Jose Rizal

Culture
DURING HIS youth, Jose Rizal was, in many ways, just a simple teenager who had big dreams for himself and his country. As we commemorate the 119th year of his martyrdom, take a look at some interesting facts about his formative years while studying in the University of Santo Tomas (UST)—years before he became one of the cornerstones of our nation’s identity. 1. A second home Like most college students at present, Rizal resided in a dormitory to avoid the inconvenience of traveling to and from UST daily. He found a second home in Casa Tomasina, a boarding house at Calle 6, Santo Tomas, behind the walls of Intramuros. He shared it with friends from a secretive organization called Compañerismo or Compañeros de Jehu of which he was president and treasurer. 2. The unsettled
PARA/PHRASE: Fil Delacruz’s Journey in Fine Print and Painting

PARA/PHRASE: Fil Delacruz’s Journey in Fine Print and Painting

Culture
WHAT DOES it take for a Thomasian to earn a National Artist nomination? Filimon “Fil” Delacruz celebrates his past years in the arts scene through a solo exhibit titled “PARA/PHRASE: An Artist’s Journey in Fine Print and Painting.” A visit to the National Commission for Culture and Arts (NCCA) gallery while strolling along the streets of Intramuros is an addition to your to-do list before November ends. 1. Exploring circumstances in “Aftermath” Designed with various patterns and shapes which embrace the entirety of the canvas, “Aftermath” is a detailed work of art which expresses concern towards the degradation of natural resources and its implications for the health of humanity. It tackles the delusional reality of how humans isolate themselves from the environment, relying
Performatura Festival 2015: Reviving and recognizing Filipino individuality

Performatura Festival 2015: Reviving and recognizing Filipino individuality

Culture
WHAT WOULD you give to learn about Philippine regional literature, witness ethnic song and dance performances, and have coffee with a national artist? Donating a book as a ticket to this kind of a three-day celebration was certainly on the bucket list. Literature and performing arts enthusiasts gathered at the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) at the launch of the first Performatura Festival last Nov. 6-8, 2015. Regional rescue of a cultural identity A king graced the halls of the Bulwagang Alagad ng Sining on Nov. 7, Saturday, during the Performatura Festival. However, Jaspe B. Dula did not acquire his kingship through blood or battle, nor did he rule over vast lands and kingdoms. Instead, the “King of Crissotan” earned his crown by being the most sonorous poet lau
Supernatural Beings and Their Haunting Legendary Tales

Supernatural Beings and Their Haunting Legendary Tales

Culture
IT IS AGAIN that time of the year when stories of ghostly creatures and haunting experiences are seen on television and heard on radio. But before the fame of vampires, werewolves, and zombies, the early people feared mythical creatures from their legends and folklore. Here are some scary creatures from around the world that would keep you on your toes when hit by wanderlust. MEXICO: La Llorona (The Weeping Woman) The story of La Llorona is popular among the Hispanics in Mexico and Southwest America. Maria was the most beautiful girl in her village. She married a young and handsome ranchero. They had two sons. It came to a time when she developed anger and jealousy as her husband grew bored of her, turning to other women and favoring the company of their sons instead. One v...
Expressing circumstances through artistry in ManilArt 2015

Expressing circumstances through artistry in ManilArt 2015

Culture
ART PATRONS assembled at the SM Aura Convention Center last Oct. 8 to 11 to view this year’s ManilArt. With the theme “Raising the Philippine Colors on the World Stage,” the country’s longest-running art fair showcased and uplifted Filipino pride and talent through visual arts such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, and photography. Let us explore some favorites and see why ManilArt has continued to amaze audiences for seven years and counting:   1. Ferdinand Cacnio's “Round and Round and Around We Go” There is that sweet spot when one is childlike and jaded—not trying, but in a state of arrival. One flies but his movement is tempered with caution. It would be foolish to be careless but then there is lightness in not going through