Wednesday, January 19

Faces

‘Treat HIV patients holistically’

‘Treat HIV patients holistically’

Faces
IT WAS supposed to be an ordinary day treating patients as a nurse—but that day was different. It was the first time Bubbles Rosos met Champ*, a patient who tested positive for HIV who was hesitant about the treatment because of the side effects. According to Rosos, Champ’s firm choice to refuse treatment was challenging because his condition needed immediate care. Serving as Champ’s counselor at the same time, Rosos convinced him to undergo treatment. Visit by visit, together with the patient's mother, the hospital staff did everything to encourage him. It was difficult, according to Rosos. But eventually, Champ decided to give treatment a chance.  Days passed, and Rosos noticed that Champ was starting to smile again.  “I was so happy when I saw him getting better. His aur
Nasaan si Balikbayan?: How an OFW family celebrates Christmas

Nasaan si Balikbayan?: How an OFW family celebrates Christmas

Faces
THE YEAR 2011 was the last time Hannah “Hans” Joy Baquiran physically celebrated Christmas with her father. This would be the tenth year they will celebrate the holidays with an unfilled seat by the dining table.  As Hans and her mother Liza Baquiran prepared food and gifts for their relatives, her father Baroy Baquiran would set up his device in time to see his family’s smiles back home.  Liza’s phone would eventually ring, she would answer and would be greeted by her husband’s voice.  From Qatar to the Philippines, a virtual connection allows them to share the joy of celebrating the Holidays. From screen to screen, they would endure the longing that precedes their situation—all in hope for their family in these coming years. Holidays Remembered After Hans’ elementary gradu
How the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters brings music in the new normal

How the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters brings music in the new normal

Faces
by MARY NICOLE P. MIRANDA THE ARTLET experience would not be complete without the music of the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters (AB Chorale) echoing in the hallways of St. Raymund’s de Peñafort building at night.  With the musical beat of the choir conductor Mark Agpasa, hearing the harmonization of the choir became a huge part of the Artlet culture—bringing color and life to their listeners. However, with the sudden shift of events as the university shifted to online learning, the harmony of AB Chorale was tested tremendously due to limitations in rehearsing in person.  Despite such restrictions, the rhythm of AB Chorale continues to play with a much deeper purpose. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_GUrZtHSHY Members turned family From simple talks and bondings between
Munimuni relives the Paskuhan experience

Munimuni relives the Paskuhan experience

Faces
by PATRICK V. MIGUEL IT WAS 2019, and despite the exhaustion from wrapping up the semester, Thomasians lined up outside the university gates. The sun was about to retire for the day and the Christmas lights glimmered brighter by the minute.  Inside the university, a band stepped onto the stage, facing thousands of Thomasians on the field. The crowd’s excited cheers slowly halted as the band began to play their instruments.   With a guitar strapped on to his body, Munimuni lead vocalist Adj Jiao stepped before the mic. Singing about love and heartbreak, Munimuni took over the stage with their music—together as a band.  Backstage excitements Recalling the time when he found out Munimuni will be performing in Paskuhan, Adj told The Flame in an email, “Na-excite ako kasi alam
[Plot Twist] The Blue Normal – Finding serenity from within

[Plot Twist] The Blue Normal – Finding serenity from within

Faces, The Blue Normal
"With only a month left in this year, what is something you are hoping for to happen?" To spend the last month of the year with my family—just the joy of enjoying each other’s company and being thankful for all God’s blessings. As simple as that. Nothing [grander] because I believe that 2021 has spared enough room for me to prosper and grow. For that, I’m thankful already.  "What do you consider your biggest plot twist this year?" [It] would be finally choosing myself [...] For so long, I was in a dark corner… This year, I learned to finally encourage myself to grow regardless of the past. I [also] learned [to muster] the courage to cut ties [with some people]  and build walls around my peace, [which is] something that won’t be broken easily.                 - Vhey Tapia, j
[Plot Twist] The Blue Normal – Powering Through

[Plot Twist] The Blue Normal – Powering Through

Faces, The Blue Normal
"What do you consider your biggest plot twist this year?" My most significant plot twist this year is surviving each day. It is not easy to wake up each day with either a heavy heart or an empty feeling. Waking up each day is not as easy as it [used] to be [...] Along the way, I realized that there are really bad days, and it is okay to allow the people around us to give us the comfort we need at the moment.  "With only a month left in this year, what is something you are hoping for to happen?" For the last month of 2021, I hope we will finish this semester strong despite the hurdles that came along our way. I hope we will be proud of ourselves for making it through everything [...] I also pray that we get through all the silent battles that we do not share with anyone but our
Artlet works as a COVID-19 swabber

Artlet works as a COVID-19 swabber

Faces
by RY PHILIP JACO T. GALVAN IN THE peak of community quarantines and mass hysteria, news broke out that Niño Jay Jusay’s parents tested positive for COVID-19. The world has not yet fully adjusted to the pandemic, and for Jay and his family, the future was not looking bright. Jay and his siblings immediately isolated themselves in their condominium in Manila. Meanwhile, a nurse tended to their parents at their house in Quezon City.  Nevertheless, they still found ways to continue their family traditions. With the parents on the other end of the video call, the Jusay family prayed earnestly as ever—hoping for a miracle. In between prayers, Jay shared in an online interview that he begged God for grace.  He prayed, “Buhayin mo lang ‘yung mom and dad ko... i-extend mo pa ang
The Blue Normal – Ang Ating Pamahiin

The Blue Normal – Ang Ating Pamahiin

Faces, The Blue Normal
"What is a superstition that you always follow?" In our town [Conception, Tarlac], we believe that whenever a funeral procession passes by, elders would wake us up because there is a saying that the soul of the deceased will take yours when you are unconscious. Another is… wearing a red shirt when attending a wake is not good. People are mourning, and the color red represents happiness or celebration. I didn’t believe all of this at first, but after [hearing] stories from my family, I began believing it. I was afraid of the consequences. "How do superstitions affect your daily life?" I feel like superstitions have been embedded in our society as a whole, and as a kid, I tend to relate my experiences a lot more often to these beliefs rather than solving them in factual terms
Chibi Saints: Evoking joy while promoting the faith

Chibi Saints: Evoking joy while promoting the faith

Faces
by LILA F. MORTEL JOSE MANUEL “JM” Castillo keeps his chibi saints in pristine condition by keeping them safe in their taped boxes.  According to his friend from Pampanga, a fellow collector, storage is key to preserving their paint job. The statues line Castillo’s room in clear cases, serving as inspiration for his faith. In time he’ll open them to make a display, or take pictures to share his joy.  Their stature is small in size but big in conviction as they serve as reminders of the people who are considered models of the Catholic faith. Ranging from P180 to P300, chibi saints can be found in both online and in physical stores along with more traditional statues. These figurines stand from a few inches to a foot and can be described as cherubic, being affectionately re
The Blue Normal – Ang Ating Pamahiin

The Blue Normal – Ang Ating Pamahiin

Faces, The Blue Normal
"Does it worry you if you do not follow certain superstitions?" I actually only follow one superstition, which is “pagpag” or not going home straight from attending a wake. It definitely worries me a lot when I do not follow “pagpag,” as I do not want to experience [the same] unfortunate incident I had before. Years ago, when my family and I went to a wake of a dear friend, we decided to skip “pagpag” since we were very eager to go home and rest. Alas, nearing our home, we got into a car accident. Luckily, no one got hurt.  "How do superstitions affect your decision-making and your daily life?" Honestly, if I had never encountered the mentioned incident, I would not believe in superstitions. I became more cautious than I ever was. A person who knows me extremely well would kno