Sunday, September 20

Faces

Loreta Arroyo shows off her true colors

Loreta Arroyo shows off her true colors

Faces
by DJULIENNE FLOR V. FOSTER photo by FRANCES MARIE G. IGNALAGA/ THE FLAME BACK IN high school, she had always readied herself with powder and a lip balm. Now, she never goes out without filling her eyebrows and adding a pop of color to her lips with lipstick. She puts on her crisp white polo shirt, black slacks, and goes out the door with a bag slung over her shoulders. Her long hair flows in the wind as her painted nails catch the attention of anyone she passes by. Loreta Arroyo walks on campus with a strut in her step and an aura of confidence; very befitting of a student leader. As the president of the UST Journalism Society, she does the duties and responsibilities that come with the position, all the while showing her truest self as a transwoman.   A woman’s rise t
Julius Renomeron Jr. and Johmar Damiles: frame by frame

Julius Renomeron Jr. and Johmar Damiles: frame by frame

Faces
by PATRICK V. MIGUEL photo by FRANCES MARIE G. IGNALAGA/ THE FLAME SEATED IN  a crowded theater,  Julius Renomeron Jr. and Johmar Damiles held their breaths. Their hearts were beating rapidly as right before their eyes, they saw the title card of their film “Heist School” appear on the big screen. Having their film premiere in the film festival once felt like a pipe dream. Now,  their dreams’ a reality.  Before becoming the award-winning director he is today,  Julius was an ordinary electronics and communication technology student. “Bago ako pumasok ng college, ang gusto kong gawin [noon] ay mostly related sa computer…. So galing ako [sa electronics and communications technology, then] nag-shift sa [informations technology] kasi [gusto kong] makapasok sa tech-industry,” he says. 
Philip Jamilla: Persevering with the masses

Philip Jamilla: Persevering with the masses

Faces
by DJULIENNE FLOR V. FOSTER photo by FRANCES MARIE G. IGNALAGA/ THE FLAME PHILIP JAMILLA always thought that he would live a normal and quiet life. He would pursue his master’s degree, become a professor, write for magazines, and eventually publish  his own books. Little did he know that his plans were about to change when he was tasked to cover a rally.  He still remembers the scene so vividly. A crowd had already been gathering right outside the campus, as they began their  march towards Luneta Park, chanting “Marcos, Hitler! Diktador, tuta!”.  He followed them, compelled to not end his coverage there. He was astounded by what he saw; a large sea of people, sharing the same fire in their eyes. As they raised their hand-painted placards in the air, the activists fiercely called
John Dale Trogo ignites the true Filipino  Artlet  spirit

John Dale Trogo ignites the true Filipino Artlet spirit

Faces
by MARY NICOLE P. MIRANDA DESPITE THE many jobs he had, the call of teaching and inspiring students always prevails in John Dale Trogo’s heart. As a Filipino professor, his mission is to equip his students well. This does not only end at the four corners of the classroom and does not limit to the pages of the book; he makes sure it starts from within their roots — their true Filipino identity.   His stepping stones John Dale Trogo is a Filipino professor at the University. He is also a member of the faculty in the College of Education. Before becoming a professor, he was a trainer in various review centers for the Civil Service and Licensure Exam for Teachers. He also worked as a junior researcher in GMA network, where he was able to travel to different places around t
Christian Tuaña: Defying Limitations

Christian Tuaña: Defying Limitations

Faces
by PATRICK V. MIGUEL THE CLOCK hits 9 in the morning, and Christian Tuaña jolts awake. Upon opening his eyes, he utters a curse before muttering,“Here we go again”.  Inside his closet is an armor he set to wear every school days. A pair of black slacks and the iconic Artlet uniform. Wielding a cane, he can transcend all limits. He prepares himself every morning, filling his backpack with magical instruments throughout his victory on his everyday battles. He leaves his house around 12 PM with a mystical carriage that will carry him to a place filled with knowledge and wisdom. A venue of self-expression and inclusivity.  There is enthusiasm inside his pocket before entering St. Raymund’s. “Minsan oo, minsan hindi…. Nagiging excited… ako if there’s something to look forward to
Kiana Porras’s call to selfless service

Kiana Porras’s call to selfless service

Faces
by LORRAINE B. LAZARO and MARIA CECILIA O. PAGDANGANAN IF HAVING an unconventional and forward-looking mindset is indeed a powerful tool that can leave an impact on the world, then Kiana Porras is undoubtedly redefining what it means to be an environmental advocate. Kiana’s fervid outlook in life has always been to help the environment. She dedicates her time and service for the earth through volunteering for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Philippines. Despite having to juggle many responsibilities, she believes that every minute of volunteering she offers is her way of paying it forward. “It’s something I really want to do. It’s something that I think may purpose siya at the end of the day. It’s more than just having an impact sa personal life mo,” she says. “It’s also [...]
Froilan Calilung ignites nationalism through teaching

Froilan Calilung ignites nationalism through teaching

Faces
by SYRAH VIVIEN J. INOCENCIO and MARY NICOLE P. MIRANDA THE CLOCK shows four in the morning—it is hours before the break of dawn, but for Froilan Calilung, his day has already started. He rises then sits on the edge of the bed where his wife also lays. He closes his eyes once again and converses with the Man above. Froi, as he is fondly called, stands up and stretches his limbs before heading toward the kitchen where he always makes breakfast for his wife and daughter. His duty as the pillar of the home does not stop there yet. After breakfast, the politics professor eagerly prepares to go to his 7 a.m class to do what he loves the most: teach. Prioritizing learning On a typical Thursday, in the College of Fine Arts and Design where Froi holds his classes for fourth ye
Angelo De Alban rises from the rubble

Angelo De Alban rises from the rubble

Faces
FRUSTRATED with the regressive state of the country, Angelo De Alban carries the needed documents to file his candidacy as he steps inside the headquarters of the Commission on Elections (Comelec) in Intramuros along with his wife Shao. He does not let himself get fazed by the intimidating questions that the media greets him with, knowing that he is advocating for worthy causes like health and food stability, cultivation of the agriculture sector, fighting for the urban poor, and championing special education, something he keeps close to his heart. “We provide special education in Bulacan. You know, we are the only private school recognized by the government providing special education [...] in our village alone. When we were growing up, we know there are [...] children who nee
A speech therapist’s pledge

A speech therapist’s pledge

Faces
By SYRAH VIVIEN J. INOCENCIO and LORRAINE B. LAZARO BEYOND the pristine and lovely neighborhood of Blue Ridge B, Quezon City is a sanctuary for life-changing miracles: Maria Lena Buhay Memorial Foundation Inc., the country’s first oral school for the deaf. Every day, the foundation’s cherished schoolchildren with bright smiles and big ambitions are given a chance to experience the world better through a rekindling of their God-given gifts. Each day is another opportunity to maximize their potentials through the caring efforts of motivators who believe in and never give up on them. Heading the school is a teacher and a mother who embraces each child with love. Leticia Buhay talks with the students while noticeably pronouncing every single word correctly. Whenever one child is
Benjo Gutierrez wields his pen for the people

Benjo Gutierrez wields his pen for the people

Faces
By ROMMEL BONG R. FUERTES JR. and LORRAINE B. LAZARO ONCE MOVING to the beat of the music, Benjamin Joshua “Benjo” Gutierrez is now moving to the rhythm of his words. The former Salinggawi Dance Troupe captain used to participate in cheerdance competitions for the tiger university, but since  bagging his diploma, he found himself focusing more on a much bigger fight: a fight to let people know the harsh reality of life, which he faces through writing. “Nabuhay ako sa cheerleading; ‘yun ang bumuhay sa akin. Pero for me, tapos na ako sa phase na ‘yun. May mas [malaki] na ako na kalaban, may iba na akong ipinaglalaban,” he says. An avenue for others As a cheerleader from high school up to college, Benjo, who used to juggle his priorities and responsibilities for both his ac