Wednesday, January 23

Faces

Makyla Chavez is ready to roar

Makyla Chavez is ready to roar

Faces
BEAUTY, brains, and charm. These are the words that first come to mind when one meets Makyla Chavez—a prim, soft-spoken lass with a bubbly personality. Her picture-perfect smile makes it no wonder why she bagged the title of courtside reporter for UAAP Season 81 despite being a freshman. Made for the spotlight Used to being in the limelight from television to print advertisements since the age of three, Makyla was never known to be shy. Whether on or off camera, she exudes warmth and displays poise that captivates everyone who meets her. For Makyla, courtside reporting is her way of expressing her gratitude and love for the University that served as her training ground for hosting and her second home. “Public speaking has always been my passion; hosting has always been my f
Arnold Azurin is changing the conversation on culture

Arnold Azurin is changing the conversation on culture

Faces
By SYRAH VIVIEN J. INOCENCIO and MARK JOSEPH B. FERNANDEZ ONE fortunate evening in the 1980s, some rising poets were given the chance to showcase their creative mettle inside none other than the grand Cultural Center of the Philippines. One of them was a middle-aged man wearing a black tuxedo on top of a patterned polo shirt, complemented by a cowboy hat that he proudly placed on top of his head. Just by looking at the way he walked toward the stage, it was evident that this man was someone who came from outside the city—a man of a place rich with the native cultures of the north. The spotlight beamed brightly on him, as though welcoming him to the stage. He then proceeded to recite his poem that boasted of the colorful traditions of Ilocos. Now 71 years old, Arnold A
The rollercoaster life of Janna Pablo

The rollercoaster life of Janna Pablo

Faces
By SYRAH VIVIEN J. INOCENCIO THE FACULTY of Arts and Letters honed the imaginative and talented Janna Pablo. Her stay within the walls of the St. Raymund de Peñafort Building as a behavioral science major helped shape the many things she has become: an artist, a teacher, and a businesswoman. The young Pabys, as she is fondly referred to by many, is not a stranger to the limelight. In 2006, she played a fashionista teenager in “Let’s Go,” an ABS-CBN television series. However, she eventually needed to give up show business to finish her studies. “I only lasted [in] showbiz for a year or two because I was 20. [M]y main priority was finishing school [...] I really wanted to graduate in four years. In my fourth year, I was taking up 49 to 52 units,” she shares. Quitting showbiz
Joselito Delos Reyes: Education with a dose of laughter

Joselito Delos Reyes: Education with a dose of laughter

Faces
By MARK JOSEPH B. FERNANDEZ and JULIA MARI T. ORNEDO HIS NAME had probably popped up on your Facebook feed at least once. Joselito Delos Reyes’ posts are hard to scroll past as they often contain witty jokes, nuggets of wisdom, or heartwarming stories about his family, which had easily earned him over 16,000 followers on the platform. Contrary to what his profile indicates, however, Delos Reyes does not work at “E di sa poso mo, beyb,” nor does he teach “rihgt and ferpect grammers.” When he is not online, the Department of Literature chairperson is either shaping the minds of young writers or crafting another literary piece to add to his award-winning body of work. Kindling lifelong passions Before venturing into the vast world of literature, Delos Reyes was first an avid r
Aleia Anies: Conquering battles through words

Aleia Anies: Conquering battles through words

Faces
By SYRAH VIVIEN J. INOCENCIO AT FIRST glance, Aleia Anies may seem like she’s a tough nut to crack, but as her plum-painted lips turn into a smile, people will think otherwise. Despite being diagnosed with Bipolar II disorder, a mental illness that causes episodes of depression and abnormally elevated mood or mania, the Communication Arts senior proves that nothing can stop her from achieving her goal. In her childhood years, she already considered herself an artist. Her vivid imagination brought her into the arts of painting, drawing, and writing stories. “Generally, I was a very artistic person, ever since pa talaga. So, growing up, I had this outlet. That’s what I was drawn to— arts,” she shared. The young artist took most of her inspiration from the books she read and l
AB Guidance Counselors: Rendering service with a genuine heart

AB Guidance Counselors: Rendering service with a genuine heart

Faces
“GUIDANCE COUNSELOR ‘yan. Hindi ‘yan maniniwala sa’yo. May [halong] judgement na nila ‘yan.” This perception is what guidance counselors of the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB) usually hear from students. Along with similar views, this refrain Artlets from visiting them, thinking that only the gravest problems are needed to be addressed by counselors. Little do they know that counselors like Carmen “Chatt” Quesada and Zyra Angeles work to help solve students’ personal dilemmas and usher them to be the best they could be. The Faculty’s guidance counselors willingly offer Artlets their open arms and give them their brightest smiles. “Ang role namin [ay i-]facilitate kayo to be on your own and to be able to become the person you want to be,” Quesada says. Coming from the heart
SubSelfie: Of and For the Millennials

SubSelfie: Of and For the Millennials

Faces
THE NOISY and distracting environment was silenced by their voices of love and dedication for stories. Journalism alumnae Lian Nami Buan and Apple Gamboa never felt short for words; they both share a love for their craft not even the pressure and restraint of the newsroom can take away from them. As part of the journalism field, Buan and Gamboa’s drive to change how things are viewed in the world continues on and off-duty through their stories. However, these were limited by the airing time of the media outlet they used to work for. Soon, they also ventured in the online world to air their voices out. Their blog SubSelfie became their tool of release. "By telling the story, mabibigyan natin ng pagkakataon ‘yung talagang may direct capability to help [people] better,” Buan shar
Bernardo Bernardo: Rising from the rubble

Bernardo Bernardo: Rising from the rubble

Faces
BERNARDO BERNARDO is 72 years old, but he has only just begun. The actor has starred in various theater plays, movies, and television shows, but his most challenging role was one that he never played on-screen—that of a comedian grappling with crippling depression. Years after he defeated his demons, Bernardo is back on track and his love for theater is stronger than it has ever been. Made for the spotlight Although Bernardo was a Journalism major, his heart belonged to the stage. As a member of the former University-wide theatric organization Aquinas Dramatic Guild, he would often portray fictional characters beneath the bright lights. After he graduated in 1966, he moved to the United States to take up his master’s degree in Dramatic Arts at the University of Californi
Karol Ilagan: Seeing the world through inquisitive eyes

Karol Ilagan: Seeing the world through inquisitive eyes

Faces
THE QUIET halls of the St. Raymund de Peñafort building leave an empty room filled only by a petite and simple individual, a discerning figure with eyes full of wonder and curiosity. As a journalist who goes beyond reporting the obvious, Karol Ilagan now faces the challenges of the world with a wider perspective, utilizing her skills in investigative journalism. She commits her curious mind to uncover the truth of an issue to contribute to change. “There are many ways for you to be able to serve the public and help other people. For me, I see journalism as difficult but I think it’s a potent way for me to be of service, to be able to contribute to positive change,” she says. A nose to the grindstone Given the challenges of politics, society, and the world, Ilagan believes
J. Neil Garcia: Textualizing Realistic Portrayals

J. Neil Garcia: Textualizing Realistic Portrayals

Faces
By CRISTINA ELOISA A. BACLIG BITTERSWEET. This is how J. Neil Garcia describes the life of homosexuals in the Philippines. As a creative writer, to write well is always the primary concern for his works. But as an author of LGBT literature, works about homosexuality are important in challenging the stigma of being non-normative on gender and sexuality. The Journalism alumnus asserts that challenging and eventually destroying the stigma is possible by confronting homophobia and prejudice head-on. Inspiration drawn from self-estrangement Before he knew of his homosexual identity and wrote pieces on homosexuality, he always wrote about his feelings. “I remember being different, not necessarily in a sexual sense, back when I was very young. I believe I’ve always written out of