Friday, January 18

Letters

Unravelling Ghosts’ Forgotten Battles in Haunted: A Last Visit to the Red House

Unravelling Ghosts’ Forgotten Battles in Haunted: A Last Visit to the Red House

Letters
By CORHEINNE JOYCE B. COLENDRES THE ILUSORIO family owned a beautiful two-story mansion that was surrounded by large gardens filled with tropical plants and flowers. The mansion stood out like a ruby gem in a sea of greenery. However, upon the Japanese occupation, the Red House turned into a sight of terror and trauma. The family mansion has long lost its luster—instead, it became a haunted house full of the ghosts of the women who became victims of the atrocities of the Japanese army. Haunted: A Last Visit to the Red House explores the lives of the surviving members of the Malaya Lola, a group that was formed by former comfort women who were taken in by the Japanese soldiers during their occupation in the Philippines. The story is woven through retelling the accounts and experie
Historiographika Errata: Ridiculous Memoirs of Absurdism

Historiographika Errata: Ridiculous Memoirs of Absurdism

Letters
By ZYMON ARVINDALE  R. DYKEE IT IS the end of the nineteenth century. In the Philippines, a revolution is brewing. Andres Bonifacio and his fellow Katipuneros are plotting to overthrow the Spaniards. Jose Rizal, in his stay in Berlin, is polishing his first novel. War is waged against the colonizers, with the goal of gaining freedom engraved in the minds of the Filipinos. And so, everyone is frustrated—Rizal decides to take his life for he cannot write his novel’s last words, and Bonifacio decides to poison the enemies with arsenic-mixed water. This is the premise of the 13th Cinema One Originals’ jury prize entry Historiographika Errata: history may be reconstructed in a comical way. Director Richard Somes switches from the plain and downright narration of the Filipino dream of
Throwback Today: In Memory of a Timeless Virtue

Throwback Today: In Memory of a Timeless Virtue

Letters
By MARIA ANTOINETTE A. MALICSE THE PRESENT moment is actually comprised of different—though perhaps not equally—sorts of variables that determine it, some of which each individual are ultimately responsible for, while others beyond his/her control. In the Cinema One Originals entry “Throwback Today,” director Joseph Teoxon makes use of time travel as instrument to edify the timeless virtue of becoming conscious of the consequences of one’s decisions, that no matter how irrelevant it may seem, every crossroad one will encounter in his/her life is still a crossroad. Through its protagonist Primo Jose Lacson (Carlo Aquino), the viewers are reminded that a single turn taken or missed can ultimately affect how long before someone reaches his/her destination if he/she will even make it
Kulay Lila ang Gabi na Binudburan pa ng mga Bituin: Lucid Realities and Sexual Fantasies

Kulay Lila ang Gabi na Binudburan pa ng mga Bituin: Lucid Realities and Sexual Fantasies

Letters, Uncategorized
By KRIZIA MAICA G. MAGBITANG JIMMY F. FLORES brings us a vivid exposure of marital life with his Palanca award-winning screenplay, Kulay Lila ang Gabi na Binudburan pa ng mga Bituin as it debuts on QCinema International Film Festival 2017. The film revolves around Aries (Jay Castillo) and Chai’s (Max Eigenmann) dysfunctional relationship and their plan to reconcile their differences by going on a couple’s retreat for three days and two nights. Evident in their rocky relationship is the seething jealousy both possess for each other’s past lovers; while Chai is still stuck on her old lover Tonyo (Raffy Alfonso), Aries’ desire for Giselle (Frida Monroe) whom he had a major crush on during his college years sparks anew ever since the news of her annulment reaches him. The camerawork
Medusae: The Eyeless Gorgon

Medusae: The Eyeless Gorgon

Letters
By ADRIAN PAUL L. TAÑEDO SOME FAMILIES have gone to various places due to the availability of work opportunities under the guise of a trip. However, things do not always go according to plan and when the occult and supernatural decide to play tricks, the victims find out that a simple get together in a remote village could be masked as days and nights spent in turmoil. Filipino directress and screenwriter Pam Miras’ Medusae is an entry to the fifth QCinema Festival.  It tells the story of a mother named Alfa Oryol (Desiree del Valle) and her son Luneta “Luni” (Carl Palaganas). Alfa and Luni set off to a remote village named Villa Norte and two spend their days working as amateur filmmakers with Alfa handling the camera and Luni managing the sounds. Alfa is a filmmaker who grab
In Neomanila, Mortality Rises while Morality Loses

In Neomanila, Mortality Rises while Morality Loses

Letters
By ZYMON ARVINDALE R. DYKEE HUMANS HAVE the tendency to struggle for their survival. When circumstances born out of naturalism render them marred, they respond to the situation by defense. This defense manifests in the form of violence. There is always a propensity to fight—to emerge from the tumultuous arena that is the world victoriously. At times, this tendency takes on the extreme, when gruesome acts such as murder break the charts. Under psychoanalysis, the id, where all basic desires reside, is in this case insurmountable as all suppression exerted by the superego is exceeded. Mikhail Red decides to picture this observation of Sigmund Freud. In Neomanila, the Audience Choice entry for the fifth QCinema International Film Festival, immorality in the city is represented by a
The Chanters: More Than A Tribal Legacy

The Chanters: More Than A Tribal Legacy

Letters
By CORHEINNE JOYCE B. COLENDRES FOR THE last chanter of their tribe, Ramon Navarro (Romulo Caballero) considers chanting to be beyond telling the story of a great epic, and merely keeping up with his tribe’s tradition. Chanting has evolved to become a means of preservation for their tribe’s entire history. Despite his old age, Ramon perseveres to pass down the Sugidanon epic to the next generation through actively recording the epics from his memory and teaching the chants to the children from their neighborhood. As he nears the end of his final book of chants, Ramon starts to show the worsening signs of dementia. The responsibility of cultural preservation soon falls down to his granddaughter, Sarah Mae (Jally Nae Gilbaliga), a young and carefree teenager who is knee-deep involv
BALANGIGA: Howling Wilderness – Painting the Unspoken in a Dreamscape

BALANGIGA: Howling Wilderness – Painting the Unspoken in a Dreamscape

Letters
By MARIA ANTOINETTE A. MALICSE CARL JUNG a Swiss psychoanalyst, believed dreams to be the direct and natural expression of the present condition of the dreamer’s internal state. In the QCinema 2017 Circle Competition entry, director Khavn De La Cruz artistically makes use of dreaming as an instrument to highlight a seemingly forgotten, but important part of history which accentuates the sense of nationalism innate in the Filipino people. With film as his chosen medium, Khavn attempts to shed light on the forgotten horrors of the Philippine-American War, specifically on the Balangiga Massacre which claimed the lives of uncountable number of Filipinos—men, women and young children included. Through Kulas (Justine Samson), an eight-year-old who miraculously managed to escape the car
Riding in Tandem: The Narrative Behind Every Gunshot

Riding in Tandem: The Narrative Behind Every Gunshot

Letters
By JESSICA MAUREEN P. GAURANO LIFE HAS always been a never-ending struggle to stay alive. However, at one point in everybody’s lives, man will always find himself moving closer towards the edge of his end. Riding in Tandem, an entry for this month’s Cinelokal, offers an answer as to where justice is written in this world manipulated by money and power. The story unfolds with Miguel (Jason Abalos), a former military officer who is dismissed from work because he is accused of having involvement in an illegal act. With nothing to support his family, he decides to work as an assassin under a syndicate. Meanwhile, in a slum area in Manila, Jonard (Khalil Ramos), a young tricycle driver who is trying to cope with the unjust death of his older sister, is faced with an inevitable circums
Captive: Capturing the Dualistic Nature of Man

Captive: Capturing the Dualistic Nature of Man

Letters
By MARIA ANTIONETTE A. MALICSE IT IS naïve to think that something as complex as a human person only has a single facet. In his film Captive, Brillante Mendoza attempted to capture the dualistic nature of man, and through injecting a flare of humanity in his characterization of the members of the Abu Sayyaf, tried to highlight the inadequacies in the Philippine government, and its lack of empathic touch in its decision-making, when, if anything, it should be its core being a sovereignty which aims to build a just and humane society. The film is told through an omniscient point of view, from multiple perspectives. Though there is a protagonist in the persona of Thérèse Bourgoine (Isabelle Huppert), the narrative divulges into the experiences of almost everyone that appears on fram