Monday, February 18

Letters

3 Stars and a Sun: A Subtle Revolution

3 Stars and a Sun: A Subtle Revolution

Letters
FIFTY YEARS from now, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration perceived that half of Manila and parts of Las Piñas will be completely gone due to the effects of climate change. On the other hand, most fantasize about a Philippines taken over by robots and highly advanced technology like “smart homes.” However, for writers Mixcaela Villalon and Rody Vera, the Philippines 70 years from now would look exactly like a dystopia, but with a few twists: a country haunted by the remains of a nuclear war, a group rebelling against their oppressive government leaders, and the Stormdome, a walled shelter established by their ancestors to “protect” what remained of the population from the possibility of their countrymen's extinction. “3 Stars and a Sun” is one of Philippine Educatio
Comedy of a Summer Romance: ‘It’s April, What Are We Doing Here?’

Comedy of a Summer Romance: ‘It’s April, What Are We Doing Here?’

Letters
NORTHROP FRYE, in his theory of Archetypes, mentions that there is a universal experience discernable in each season of the year. Summer, he said, was the start of romance: the celebration of marriage and the consummation of love. However, Palanca award-winning writer Rolando Tinio rebels on this idea. In the very title of his play “It’s April, What Are We Doing Here?” one can delineate a dejected rhetoric—a certain feeling of disappointed yearning and frigid impassivity. In his play, summer represents the slow degradation of romantic love. The play was recently staged by IKARUS in a black-box type studio at DITO: Bahay Ng Sining, in Concepcion, Marikina City. Set in Manila during the 60s, the play starts when Teresina catches her husband, Nicholas, inside the apartment of his
William: Mystery behind the Name

William: Mystery behind the Name

Letters
RON CAPINDING'S rap-musical “William” showcases the blend of Shakespearean literature and Philippine culture. The play introduces five junior high school students pondering on the questions, “Who is William Shakespeare?” and “Why are his writings considered important?” The students are stock characters, portraying stereotypical teenage high school students represented by a specific color. Blue signifies Erwin, the socially-awkward boy, because of his shyness and lack of individuality as he seems to blend with the walls, unnoticed by his friends. Sophia, the pretty and popular girl but considerably shallow, has pink as her distinctive color, lively and attached to sophisticated things. TJ, the obnoxious jock, is characterized with green to represent his envious personality. Yellow descri