Monday, July 26

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Rector to graduates: Failure is part of success

Rector to graduates: Failure is part of success

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by KAREN RENEE S. NOGOY UST RECTOR Very Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P. urged graduating Thomasians to not be afraid of failing for it is the only way to succeed during the Baccalaureate Mass for Class 2021 held Friday. “Do not be afraid to fail, for success is not far behind; be satisfied with your lot in order for you to be happy; be happy in order for you to be grateful; and be grateful in order for you to be blessed more. This is my own version of the Beatitudes,” Ang said in his homily. Comparing the graduates' journey to the Parable of the Sower where the sower did not give up until the seeds bore fruit despite the obstacles, Ang told the graduates that this day would not have come if there had been no failures. The Rector reminded the graduates to be satisfied with what they
Artlets, orgs recognized in virtual Student Awards

Artlets, orgs recognized in virtual Student Awards

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by KAREN RENEE S. NOGOY and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM STUDENTS AND organizations from the Faculty of Arts and Letters were recognized during the Student Awards for their excellence and contributions on academic, community development, and leadership service in the past two academic years (AY), held virtually on Friday. Legal management student Ethan Vaughn Ong received the Rector’s Academic Award, an award given to a student who obtained the highest scholastic rating, for AY 2020-2021.  “I would like to thank God for guiding me and supporting me in every step of the way. And I devote this award to my father and mother and as well as to my lolos and lolas who extended their love beyond measure,” Ong said. Communication Arts alumna Marjon Angela Cano received the Rector’s Academic Aw
Gov’t dependency challenges news coverage, journ profs’ study shows

Gov’t dependency challenges news coverage, journ profs’ study shows

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by KAREN RENEE S. NOGOY and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM   THE RELIANCE of journalists on government for information challenged the news coverage in the new normal, according to a study by UST journalism professors presented on Friday in a research conference. The study “Reporting in the New Normal: The Impact of Covid-19 Pandemic on Journalism (Perspective from South and Southeast Asia)” by Felipe Salvosa II, journalism program coordinator, and Asst. Prof. Christian Esguerra in collaboration with Global Risk Journalism Hub found that among 175 respondents, the Philippines (91 percent) and India (87 percent) highly agreed that they depend on the government for information.  “We have been reduced to interviewing mostly via [online conferencing platforms]. If you watched the Ma
Remote reporting causes one-way flow of information—journalist

Remote reporting causes one-way flow of information—journalist

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by JENNA KAYE M. PANDANAN  THE PANDEMIC has forced journalists to do news coverage at home and wait for the statements online, making the flow of information one way, a business journalist and Artlet alumna said Friday in a webinar organized by the UST Journalism Society. Macroeconomic and urban development story writer for BusinessMirror Marie Carisa Ordinario discussed Manny Mogato’s Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility piece titled ‘Pandemic Blues’ that focused on the journalists’ struggle in remote reporting.  Due to quarantine restrictions and health risks, journalists are forced to work from home and wait for the statements online in which news sources could control the information in one direction.  “The best thing we can do is to wait for their statements. The pr
‘Ethics of thinking’ creates deeper understanding on situations—philo prof

‘Ethics of thinking’ creates deeper understanding on situations—philo prof

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by MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM THE ETHICS of thinking offers deeper understanding of the pandemic by allowing the mind to think beyond the anthropological view, philosophy professor Paolo Bolaños said Thursday during the launching of his book “Nietzsche and Adorno on Philosophical Praxis, Language, and Reconciliation: Towards an Ethics of Thinking.” Bolaños mentioned that the ethics of thinking is “a guide of thinking that is motivated by guilt” because humans, as rational beings, were responsible for understanding human and non-human others.  He suggested that utilizing ethical thinking as a philosophical practice would enable humans to recognize the pandemic adversaries from the perspective of non-human others—the point of view of being a virus.  “If we are able to do that at l
CW dept’s Parabayle wins championship in Cypher

CW dept’s Parabayle wins championship in Cypher

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by JANIS JOPLIN G. MOISES and ARTHUR N. APOSTOL UST MAKATHA Circle representatives, Parabayle, is this year's champion in a virtual dance competition of the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB), Transcendence: Cypher 2.0, held Thursday via Facebook live. Parabayle bested five participants from Behavioral Science (BES), Legal Management (LM), and communication programs. Parabayle was crowned champion with their dance concept that was inspired by their experiences in managing their own online businesses during the pandemic while incorporating girl power in their choreography. “This win was completely unexpected. I remember crying after announcing the champions. This was my first competition in college and I’d be leaving a legacy for our society,” Parabayle team captain Bea Masicl
New Artlet CSC officers to resume efforts of current EB

New Artlet CSC officers to resume efforts of current EB

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by JANIS JOPLIN MOISES and KAREN RENEE NOGOY THE NEWLY-elected Artlet officers to lead the Central Student Council (CSC) in the next academic year will continue the efforts of the current Executive Board--to heighten student representation, sustainable projects, and progress on the Students' Code, outgoing CSC Secretary Krizia Milleny Bricio told The Flame. Bricio is the new president of the CSC after securing 24,896 votes in the recent polls while recording 3,952 unanswered ballots. “[There] will be a smoother transition and, of course, we will be able to continue everything that we worked hard on during our term as secretary,” Bricio said. The “Conduit” and “Constitution Revision” policy will start with an agenda-setting with the Central Board and Executive Board, Bricio said
Independent, DEKADA both snag 2 posts in ABSC

Independent, DEKADA both snag 2 posts in ABSC

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by JENNA KAYE M. PANDANAN, MARIE CLAIRE “BLANCHE” S. LAGRISOLA, and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM INDEPENDENT CANDIDATES claimed the position of vice president (VP)-internal and public relations officer (PRO), while political party DEKADA secured treasurer and secretary positions in the recent polls for the Artlets Student Council (ABSC). Julliana Flores will lead the ABSC as the VP-Internal after garnering 894 votes, defeating DEKADA’s bet Josea Roy Dimasuay who garnered 728 votes, while 176 Artlets left the position unanswered. Despite being an independent candidate, Flores ensured that this will not hinder her in creating a united student council.  "We must work together on how we can move forward as a body in the realization of our shared goals, that is to guarantee a unified and p
HSTSOC elects new executive board, promotes ‘open fund drive’

HSTSOC elects new executive board, promotes ‘open fund drive’

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by MARIE CLAIRE LAGRISOLA and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM NEWLY-ELECTED Executive Board officers are set to lead the UST History Society (HSTSOC) for the next academic year (AY), History Society - Commission on Elections (HSTSOC Comelec) announced Monday evening. History sophomore Joel Benedict Cabo will lead the History Society as its next president after securing votes from 15 districts. Cabo believes that there is a need to provide sufficient student support and representation. "It seems that there has been a lack of the said services [student support and representation] from the societies these days due to the challenges posed by the pandemic, but I do not blame the current executive board at all. They have tried in the best of their capabilities, despite taking the blow," Cabo t...
The real frontline is in the community—physician

The real frontline is in the community—physician

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by KAREN RENEE S. NOGOY COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE workers bridge the gap between health institutions like the Department of Health (DOH) and the community, a physician said Wednesday in an online roundtable discussion. Dr. Tina Ignacio-Alberto, the founder of Hope in Me Club, an organization of volunteer patients and doctors in Cavite, emphasized that the real frontline is not in hospitals nor big institutions, but in the community.  “We are community educators, we are the ones who can integrate healthcare programs in our community, [and] we can also mobilize our community to promote health programs,” said Alberto. Meanwhile, head of Mission and First Counsellor of the Embassy of France in Manila, Fabrice Fize, urged institutions to reaffirm commitment to the health systems of the