Monday, November 29

Scenes

Artlets told to hold dialogues with deniers of Martial Law abuses

Artlets told to hold dialogues with deniers of Martial Law abuses

Scenes
by ARTHUR N. APOSTOL ARTLETS SHOULD engage in dialogue instead of acting as agents of cancel culture, especially on discussions about Martial Law, a community development expert said. Tyrone Nepomuceno, UST-Simbahayan Community Development coordinator, said people should promote a culture of dialogue with the deniers of the Martial Law abuses as individuals hold different experiences during the era. “It could be good for some, but it could be bad for others, we need to listen to both the positive and negative sides,” Nepomuceno said during the 'Martial Law Balik-Balikan: A Webinar on Historical Distortion and Fact-Checking of Martial Law Resources' last Nov. 18. However, the fact that several Filipinos were victimized during Martial Law should not be overlooked, Nepomuceno
Do not be a source of persecution, Christians told

Do not be a source of persecution, Christians told

Scenes
by NILLICENT B. BAUTISTA A DOMINICAN priest has urged Thomasians to be in solidarity with one another despite religious differences during the Red Wednesday mass in honor of persecuted Christians worldwide. Differences in religious beliefs should not hinder people from reaching out and helping those who are suffering, UST Senior High School Regent Fr. Ermito de Sagon, O.P. said. “We have to be very careful because [sometimes], we are the very source of persecution. We shouldn’t be persecuting one another just because we think we have the right thinking with regards to God,” de Sagon said in his homily last Nov. 24. “We shouldn’t be persecuting one another, we should be helping one another and growing in our faith,” he added. The University commemorated the Red Wednesday,
UST releases guidelines for expanded limited F2F classes

UST releases guidelines for expanded limited F2F classes

Scenes
by KRISTINE ERIKA L. AGUSTIN THE OFFICE of the Secretary-General (OSG) has formally released the University’s guidelines and preparations on the expansion of limited face-to-face classes (LF2F) to programs other than medical and health allied. In a memorandum dated Nov. 24 signed by Fr. Louie Coronel, O.P., the OSG said expanding the LF2F classes to other programs would be done “slowly and progressively” in observance of the health and safety protocols on the campus. “Enriched Virtual Mode of instruction (EVM) shall continue to be the primary mode of instructional delivery for all programs. LF2F shall only be considered for learning competencies or learning outcomes that cannot be effectively achieved using EVM,” the memorandum read. Additional programs that intend to conduct L
Educate, not bash, people who believe in false info – sociologists

Educate, not bash, people who believe in false info – sociologists

Scenes
by ARTHUR N. APOSTOL FILIPINOS SHOULD engage in active citizenship by educating people vulnerable to false information rather than criticizing them, sociologists said. Active citizenship entails developing critical thinking and using facts to raise awareness, Mindanao State University-General Santos City sociology professor Mario Aguja said. “In Sociology, we are trained to speak about the facts. [Whether] they accept it or they don’t accept it, we deliver our facts and we use our facts to convince a lot of people,” said Aguja during the ‘Ikaw, Anong Ambag Mo? Government Political Systems and Policy Implementation Amidst Pandemic’ webinar last Nov. 13. Aguja noted that facts in discourses are being replaced by opinions in social media, but one’s action should always be guid
Punish peddlers of disinformation, voters told

Punish peddlers of disinformation, voters told

Scenes
VOTERS SHOULD “punish” campaign teams that spread false information during the election period, a public relations expert said. Alan German, president of the Agents International Public Relations, said political campaigns become “clumsy” and “amateurish” if they are run based on “disingenuity.” “The best way to police the PR (public relations) industry [is to] punish them. Who can punish them? The voters. When you see candidates using disinformation as their primary weapon or tool, do not vote for them. This way the PR will learn as well,” German said during the 'Truth Well Told: Political PR and Advertising' forum last Nov. 10. “We saw a lot of candidates in the past [who] were the best at something, but it was not important to the voters. It has to be believable because if y
UST may apply for F2F classes before December

UST may apply for F2F classes before December

Scenes
by KRISTINE ERIKA L. AGUSTIN and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM THE UNIVERSITY may apply for limited face-to-face classes for the rest of the degree programs before December once the proposals of the academic units are approved by the University Crisis Management Committee (UCMC), top administrators said. “As soon as the proposals of academic units are approved by the UCMC, the retrofitted facilities are ready for visit, and the documentary requirements have been completed by the academic units, we can submit their applications even before December as was relayed during the town hall meeting with CHED,” Vice-Rector for Academic Affairs Cheryl Peralta and Secretary General Fr. Louie Coronel, O.P. said in a joint statement sent to The Flame. The government’s COVID-19 inter-agency task force
Professorial Chair holder: Never forget Martial Law

Professorial Chair holder: Never forget Martial Law

Scenes
FILIPINOS MUST remember what happened during Martial Law as forgetting or denying the abuses during the period is a form of silencing its victims, a multi-awarded scholar said. Prof. Joyce Arriola, holder of the Teodoro F. Valencia Professorial Chair in Journalism, noted that an avalanche of information and the plurality of opinions are competing with the truth behind the Martial Law narrative. “Some of this information may be true, but some are also false. [Forgetting as an] annulment is done by flooding the market with information, which led to confusion and the muting of the essential story,” Arriola said during her professorial lecture last Nov. 13. Arriola, also the director of the Research Center for Culture, Arts, and the Humanities, said values such as truth, justice,