Wednesday, January 23

Perspectives

In Pursuit of *The One*

In Pursuit of *The One*

Perspectives
YOU SIT down in front of your computer, determined to set out on the journey of discovering the forest of related researches you need to collate for your undergraduate research. Then you go on to Google Scholar, and scour through pages and more pages of researches just to enrich your RRLs collection. Then you stumble upon what I call *The One*, that one study that is very much related or overwhelmingly similar to what you are planning to pursue, only to find out that you can only acquire a copy through either of these options: (1) Download the PDF version of the study after registering your credit card details (this, for my case, often spells “Abort mission!”); (2) Sign up for a five-, 10-, 15-, or even a 30-day trial and pay a hefty amount after that period; (3) Log-in to a particular
The Problem with Keeping it Real

The Problem with Keeping it Real

Perspectives
IS IT still good to “be real” if the “real” you is bitter and hateful? In a video that went viral online, former Miss Earth-Philippines 2016 Imelda Schweighart could be seen letting go of her “true self” as she hung around her fans in the backstage after the pageant. In the video, she was caught saying, “’Yung nanalo peke ilong, peke baba, peke boobs. Miss Earth dapat natural ‘di ba?” Apparently, Schweighart, who did not even make it to the pageant’s top 16, was talking about Miss Earth 2016 Katherine Espin of Ecuador. The small crowd cheered her on, unalarmed by the fact that our country was being represented by a disgraceful sore loser saved by her looks. Sour grape is perhaps typical to us Filipinos. Millions cried for a recount when Bongbong Marcos lost the vice-presiden
Humanity in Reverse?

Humanity in Reverse?

Perspectives
IN CASE you missed it, your ancestor is an ape. Evolution helped us to become more human and taught us to walk on two feet. Thankfully, evolution also took out all the excessive growth of body hair and made our brain more capable of thinking and adapting. Changes are not only evident with us, humans, but also, with the whole world, and over time, there is progress. One thing that is still on the slow process of change is the mentality that men are superior to women. In history, men see women as second-class citizens which hindered them from getting fair treatment. Up until now, we can still feel the inequality between the two sexes, but now is the best time to stop repeating history and start listening to “herstory.” Just recently, a Twitter post went viral after it featured a
Static

Static

Perspectives
I REMEMBER it clearly—it was a Saturday and I was wearing my Type-B uniform. As I approached the water fountain, I came across my block mate who immediately noticed my shirt. “Buti ka pa may Type-B na,” she said. Puzzled, I replied, “Hala bakit kayo wala pa rin?” While walking back to our room, it bothered me that some of my block mates are yet to receive their Type-B uniforms even until now that we are already in third year. As far as I can remember, we placed our orders when we were on the second term of our freshman year. Two years later, the Type-B uniforms are still nowhere to be found for some Artlets. In a September 2015 report by the Flame, data showed that out of the total 8,648 Type-B uniforms ordered, there are some 1,197 left undistributed to the first, second, and third
RePRESSed

RePRESSed

Perspectives
TO SILENCE the campus press is to silence the student body. Last month, the Philippine Collegian, the student publication of the University of the Philippines (UP)-Diliman, sought the help of the publications in the University of Santo Tomas (UST) to uphold campus press freedom following the attacks against campus press in the recent days. The Philippine Collegian was prohibited from printing its first issue for this academic year due to UP’s complicated procurement process. Meanwhile, there are plans to dismantle the college publications in the Polytechnic University of the Philippines and replace them with a centralized publication. Data from the College Editors Guild of the Philippines showed that there were more than 800 cases of campus press freedom violations from 2010 to 20
Getting Away With Catcalling

Getting Away With Catcalling

Perspectives
AFTER VISITING my dog at the hospital, I had to rush to UST for a 3 p.m. meeting. I chose to board an FX going to Morayta and sat beside the driver because what could go wrong with having fewer seats to fill and decent air conditioning? Apparently, a lot. The driver, who introduced himself as “Jason,” decided to forcibly dig deep into my personal life, had the guts to ask my number and warn me that he’d be waiting for me along Quezon Avenue and be “more than happy” to have me as his passenger again. I could only nod and smile and by the time I got off at P. Noval, I was shaking. This is the type of harassment that haunts me every day, even when all I want to do is get to my destination and walk the streets with nothing to worry about. And when I was about to go to bed and I saw
Some Flavors Turn Sour

Some Flavors Turn Sour

Perspectives
MOCHA WAS a pretty good flavor—not until it manifested itself as something so distasteful. In case you are wondering, this is not about food or satiating the taste buds. In fact, this is about satisfying a deeper hunger that is of the intellect. However, in order to address this in a manner in which I will not stoop down to the level I am about to lambast in this piece, I must grapple for words with just the right amount of disdain hoping that my criticism would not look too catty. So here goes. During the previous elections, Filipino netizens were all about politics—the debates, election violence, the candidates’ pronouncements, witty jingles and the memes that went viral—in an outright showcase of democratic engagement powered by social media. With the immense popularity a
A Recuperating ABSC From Lazo and Avila (And Quitoy)

A Recuperating ABSC From Lazo and Avila (And Quitoy)

Perspectives
STRUCK BY controversies and distrust, the Faculty of Arts and Letters Student Council (ABSC) is taking light but bold steps in regaining the Artlets’ trust. Those plaguing issues did not fall on deaf ears, but generated much interest among Artlets—as the supermajority is still walking on eggshells. The trust shattered into pieces when P 50,000-worth of Artlet activity funds went missing under the watch of then-council Treasurer Julienne Avila and then-council President Marie Jann Klaire Lazo. The ax fell against the two officers who were held guilty of gross negligence of duties, and as consequence, did not receive their certificates of good moral character and were not given the reimbursement for the cash advance they paid to cover the lost fund. Avila also served 50 hours of commun
Same Old

Same Old

Perspectives
DURING THE first week of our classes, my block was not able to meet our professor in Ethics because the room assigned for that period was occupied by another class. In the second week, we were not able to meet our professor again because of the same reason. It was only in the third week that we finally had our first meeting and had secured a classroom in the St. Raymund de Peñafort Building for that subject. Fortunately, it was a productive meeting for everyone and we made up for lost time. However, come the fourth week, our class president announced that our classes in Ethics would be held at the Tan Yan Kee Student Center for the rest of the semester. This scenario has become a usual thing in the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB) and is just one of the many grimacing moments t
The Crumbling of the Fourth Estate

The Crumbling of the Fourth Estate

Perspectives
IT IS a thankless job. During the first 100 days of our president, his press conferences became a “culture shock” of some sort to the media. His way of speaking, sprinkled with colorful expletives, landed the headlines of every news entity. Meanwhile, as his avid supporters cried foul as they threw around words like “biased” or “bayaran,” some took into consideration the issue at hand—even explaining the difference of the culture that our president is used to, that his words should not be taken literally; while the rest resorted to attacking the character of the media instead. It had gotten worse when the president himself decided not to entertain Manila-based reporters anymore. He explained that some reporters sensationalize their stories to be able to sell them to readers, thus