Saturday, September 21

Issues

Accusations and lessons: Behind the impeachment complaint

Accusations and lessons: Behind the impeachment complaint

Issues
by FATE EMERALD M. COLOBONG and ALYSSA MAE S. RAFAEL ON Mar. 21, less than a week before the start of the 2019 Artlets Student Council (ABSC) general elections, a memorandum released by the Board of Majors (BOM) rocked the Artlet community. It was an impeachment complaint filed by 28 Artlets, composed mostly of Asian studies seniors, against incumbent ABSC President Rafael Arellano for “gross negligence of duties,” citing the “disappointing” AB Week and the failure to distribute last academic year’s official AB merchandise. After the BOM’s deliberation on the complaint, it concluded that Arellano will not undergo an impeachment trial due to “lack of sufficient evidence” to support the accusations of the complainants. However, the BOM, which acts as the impeachment tribunal of
A new breed of voters: Examining the power of the Artlet vote

A new breed of voters: Examining the power of the Artlet vote

Issues, The Flame Explains
By ANA GABRIELLE CEGUERA THE ARTLET community continues to constantly be at the forefront of movements against injustices and calls for accountability. In the recently concluded midterm elections, there is no doubt Artlets played a huge role in influencing others to exercise their right to vote and determine the nation’s history. As students of the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB) who have always been exposed to the culture of politics and governance, it is undeniable that the Artlet community has the leverage in choosing their candidates. With this knowledge at hand, one must know how influential an Artlet’s vote could be. “Napakalaki ng impluwensiya natin, especially in the University, given that we, of course, are from the liberal arts. We are exposed to politics, differen
Vox Populi: How do Artlets assess the performance of the ABSC?

Vox Populi: How do Artlets assess the performance of the ABSC?

Issues
Compiled by HALEE ANDREA B. ALCARAZ and PEACH ARIANNA P. MANOS THE FACULTY, once again, has a new roster of officers and it will now be up to them to live up to the duties and responsibilities of the student council. Although they will assume office next academic year, all eyes are still on the incumbent Artlets Student Council (ABSC) and how they were able to deliver the promises they made. While it cannot be denied that they achieved some of their goals and fulfilled some of the promises they gave to the Artlet community last year, it is also evident that there is a clamor for accountability and integrity from the council. The incumbent ABSC, which lacks a vice president-internal and a public relations officer despite several special elections due to the absence of candidate...
Faculty evaluation: An instrument for improvement or just another requirement?

Faculty evaluation: An instrument for improvement or just another requirement?

Issues
By HALEE ANDREA B. ALCARAZ and ANA GABRIELLE CEGUERA GONE are the days when lecturers and professors can execute their individual teaching strategies without students having a say on it. The University requires that for excellent education to be achieved, it has to listen to its indispensable stakeholders—the students—through a “comprehensive” faculty evaluation. However, as the students evaluate their teachers’ performances every semester, they have not been convinced with the effectivity of the faculty evaluation in improving the professors’ pedagogies; faculty members themselves are divided on whether or not the evaluation process yields any change. Encouraging growth The main purpose of the faculty evaluation is for the faculty members to become better college educators
Upholding excellence: Building a culture of research

Upholding excellence: Building a culture of research

Issues
By ALYSSA MAE S. RAFAEL and PEACH ARIANNA P. MANOS IN an effort to meet the demands of higher education institutions, the University of Santo Tomas (UST) is geared toward providing quality education and promoting excellence in different fields and disciplines. The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) recognized these efforts and gave prestigious seals of Center of Excellence (COE) and Center of Development (COD) to 24 programs of UST. In 2015, UST received the highest number of accredited academic programs among private institutions. Four of these programs were from the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB). The philosophy program was recognized as a COE, while the literature, journalism, and communication arts programs were accredited as CODs. These recognitions are a good ...
Sorry or not sorry?: Assessing the state of equipment and facilities in AB

Sorry or not sorry?: Assessing the state of equipment and facilities in AB

Issues
By FATE EMERALD M. COLOBONG and PEACH ARIANNA P. MANOS A RECENT opinion article in the Flame talked about the “sorry state” of facilities and equipment in the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB). However, AB Dean Michael Anthony Vasco begged to disagree. READ: The sorry state of affairs in AB “Tayo lang ang kolehiyo, I think, na lahat ng classrooms ay may flat screen TV, and yet you say na it’s a ‘sorry state.’ [...] bakit tayo lang ang may flat screen TV sa 27 classrooms natin? Tapos lahat merong multimedia projector, lahat merong built-in microphone,” he said. On AB equipment In Academic Year (A.Y.) 2013 to 2014, AB procured ten 52-inch LED TVs for classrooms. Four academic years later, all 27 rooms in AB already have built-in televisions complete with the EZCast softwar
A closer look: Issues and problems facing AB socs and orgs

A closer look: Issues and problems facing AB socs and orgs

Issues
By ALYSSA MAE S. RAFAEL and ANA GABRIELLE CEGUERA THE FACULTY of Arts and Letters (AB), which offers 13 academic degree programs and houses nine interest organizations, is known to be the most diverse faculty in the University. All 13 academic disciplines, each with its own society, aim to promote values and bring out the potential of the students. AB is built on the foundation of camaraderie and learning beyond the four corners of a classroom. However, being the melting pot of different majors and organizations, the Faculty faces issues and concerns that need to be addressed. Newly implemented rules This academic year, the Faculty administration imposed new rules on all societies and organizations. These included limiting the number of projects and events, restricting t
Federalism: A road to inclusive growth?

Federalism: A road to inclusive growth?

Issues
DURING his campaign in 2016, President Rodrigo Duterte promised to undertake a constitutional reform that will change the country’s current unitary system of government into a federal one. His appointed consultative committee has already come up with a draft charter to replace the 1987 Constitution. However, “the revision itself has not yet formally started,” Department of Political Science Chairperson Dennis Coronacion clarified in an interview with the Flame. Is it truly necessary for the Philippines to adopt a federal form of government? Empowering local government units For Coronacion, federalism is “an advantage” because it will empower the local government units (LGUs) by allowing them to make decisions by themselves since the current form of government considers
THE FLAME EXPLAINS: Amendments to the ABSC Constitution

THE FLAME EXPLAINS: Amendments to the ABSC Constitution

Issues, The Flame Explains
By ALYSSA MAE S. RAFAEL SINCE THE last amendment on February 11, 2005 to the Artlets Student Council (ABSC) Constitution, the eight-page document has been subjected to various amendment attempts by the different student councils that have taken office through the years. Last academic year, then ABSC President Reymark Simbulan proposed the amendment of the Constitution through a Constitutional Convention (ConCon). Its three reading sessions concluded on March 24. However, Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB) Dean Michael Anthony Vasco did not sign the proposed Constitution after the Faculty Council rejected the amendments. This caused the delay of the plebiscite, which was originally set to take place after the reading sessions. “Kumpleto na ‘yung signatures ng students. The n
A search for leaders: Understanding the lack of candidates for PRO

A search for leaders: Understanding the lack of candidates for PRO

Issues
By CRIS EUGENE T. GIANAN and FATE EMERALD M. COLOBONG IN THE two times that the Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB) Commission on Elections (Comelec) opened the filing of certificates of candidacy (COCs) for the position of Public Relations Officer (PRO) of the Artlets Student Council (ABSC), a position that has been vacant for about five months now, not one Artlet showed up to file a candidacy. The first filing of COCs was held on Sept. 13, while a second attempt was held on Oct. 15. The glaring disinterest of Artlets in vying for a seat in the council has led the Flame to ask: what could be the reason for the absence of candidates for PRO? Lack of qualified candidates For Comelec Chairperson Giselle Manzano, election rules and the shift to K to 12 may have contributed to th