Wednesday, January 19

Culture

The art of thriving: Embracing challenges through art

The art of thriving: Embracing challenges through art

Culture
by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO THE PREVIOUS years of isolation may have brought Filipinos time to ponder new realizations and meaning in their lives. In those years, the presence of anxiety and fear were felt in different situations. Their despondency may be caused by pandemic adversaries: sickness, death of a loved one, political chaos, financial distress, or mental illness. However, human beings also have the capacity to overcome these challenges. This was visualized by Jayson Cortez in his art exhibit titled ‘Revisioning The Breakout After Despondency.’ Cortez, whose collection centers on victory and growth amid struggles, shared how he became optimistic despite his own familial challenges. “I think it’s so important to be optimistic during these times. That’s the baby step
21 Notable Stories of 2021

21 Notable Stories of 2021

Culture
The Flame recaps 21 highlights of the second pandemic year: 1. Delta and Omicron variants spook Filipinos The Delta and Omicron variants were among the new COVID-19 variants that spread more quickly than other strains. The first Omicron variant cases in the Philippines were detected from two incoming travelers, a returning overseas Filipino from Japan and a Nigerian national. The World Health Organization classified Omicron as a variant of concern after discovering that it has several mutations that could affect the transmissibility of the virus and the severity of the disease. 2. Candidates file COC for 2022 polls Filipinos started to feel the heated election season when aspirants for national and local elective posts for next year’s polls filed their certificates of c
Enliven the Christmas spirit with resourceful decorations

Enliven the Christmas spirit with resourceful decorations

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA THE START of Paskuhan is usually marked by the illuminating of Christmas decorations.  From glittering lights and intricate ornaments to the towering Christmas tree in the University’s grandstand, these decorations are what make the Paskuhan event more enjoyable, said Andrew Joseph Chanco, a Theology instructor. “The different themes of the decorations displayed around the campus make the people feel the vibes of the Christmas season [...] it makes the Thomasian experience more memorable,'' he told The Flame. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic struck, and for two long years, Thomasian students were unable to delight in the University’s decorations.  Despite this stress-filled situation, it’s not too late to enliven the Christmas spirit. You
Thomasian tales: Flashbacks on pre-pandemic Paskuhan moments

Thomasian tales: Flashbacks on pre-pandemic Paskuhan moments

Culture
RECOGNIZED as the most anticipated annual event for every Thomasian since 1991, the University's Paskuhan marks its 30th year with the theme ‘The Pilgrimage: Our road through trials, our road through triumph.’ The University invites Thomasians in its second virtual Paskuhan this year. The chief-of-staff of the University of Santo Tomas - Central Student Council Gilbert Estropia Jr. said that last year’s Paskuhan presented recordings of programs but the performances this year will be live on-site. “The University is really trying their best to produce programs that Thomasians will enjoy, but this year’s Paskuhan, we made it a point to make it on-site, where the bands and the production will perform live on campus,” Estropia told The Flame. Let’s look back on some of the favorit
Start a fruitful Christmas season with fruity drinks and desserts

Start a fruitful Christmas season with fruity drinks and desserts

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK R. MAGNO RANARA and THEA ANDREA C. MAGUERIANO A BOWL of fruits on a center table of a typical Filipino dining room not only adds vibrant colors to one's home but also becomes part of the Filipino food culture. In this time of yuletide season, fruits become staples of Filipino favorites, including buko salad, halo-halo, and even pineapples in macaroni salad. But if you do not know how to prepare this kind of delicacy, you can always opt to order healthy options for fruity desserts instead. A sweet and savory prism in a cup Despite being a Singaporean dessert shop, Nine Fresh guarantees that its fruit bowl menu will satisfy Pinoys’ sweet cravings. It is generous with its toppings of over 20 choices of beans, jellies, and black pearls. Its ingredients are
Superstitions and myths: More than just tales of old

Superstitions and myths: More than just tales of old

Culture
YOU MIGHT have dwelt on the stories of the duwende, tikbalang, white lady, or kapre at one point in time during your childhood. But the belief in these creatures is more than just eerie tales. They are ingrained in the Filipino culture and have been inspiring artists to create terrifying yet appealing works. Filipino myths, legends, epics, and the like often serve as inspiration in various forms of art of painters, writers, filmmakers, and animators, according to the National Commission for Culture and Arts (NCCA). These tales may have been used to scare children but they remain relevant to Filipinos as they form part of their culture. "Superstitions are part of the daily lives of the Filipinos [...] it is deeply rooted in our culture and it has been with us almost since th...
The breast talk: Uncommon conversations that matter

The breast talk: Uncommon conversations that matter

Culture, The Culturist
by CHRISTINE JANINE T. CORTEZ INSUFFICIENT breast health education may feel frightening for women who live in a critical society that may have far-fetched body standards and expectations. At present, a social media disease known as “boob shaming” is becoming a trending stigma and a poor habit that cultivates within the harmful side of society and the internet. This form of social discrimination and unsolicited attack is manifested when the public criticizes how women’s breasts look.  The issue is often hardly discussed or brought to people’s attention because a majority may think that breast talk is merely a joke that is either too personal or too sexual. Why breast awareness is vital to women  Breast Cancer Awareness Month every October is a campaign inspired by a globa
Dreading the prelim exams? How to overcome that academic anxiety

Dreading the prelim exams? How to overcome that academic anxiety

Culture
TO LEARN is not just to comply. Students may catch up in the online setting, but long-term retention of information is not guaranteed. Academic anxiety, procrastination, and online distractions are still barriers to maximize e-learning. As students prepare for the upcoming preliminary examinations, The Flame interviewed three Artlets on their insights and strategies for dealing with distant learning and mental burnouts. 1. Make time for self-care One should not feel guilty for resting. For Mattew Marbella, a fourth-year political science student, resting is an effective study tip. “Taxing yourself with too much academic burden could be counterproductive and may cause you to burn out. [You can] watch your favorite series or play your favorite game before doing your academ
All Thomasian exhibit showcases the changing landscape of art

All Thomasian exhibit showcases the changing landscape of art

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA FROM PREHISTORIC carvings to postmodern art styles, art has truly come a long way. Thomasian alumni showcased the evolution of art in the newly-launched art exhibit titled Vision X Interpolation: All Thomasian Art Exhibition. It flaunted generational practices and stylisms embodied by 22 artists from the University through paintings, print, and sculptural works. The exhibit was on display at Art Anton in Pasay City last Sept. 8 to Sept. 23. Despite COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, guests at home still had a chance to enjoy the artworks through a 360-degree virtual tour. The theme of the exhibit revolves around interpolation, which pertains to an object’s insertion. According to the exhibit’s curator Abe Orobia’s write-up, interpolation in art
Admiring the real Manila through the senses

Admiring the real Manila through the senses

Culture
THE PANDEMIC may have revealed that home is the safest place for many Filipinos but the world on the inside is not the same for people whose home is outside.  Traditional artist and storyteller Marius Cornelius Funtilar, otherwise called Marius Black, focused on Manila’s nooks and crannies. He adds depth to his artworks with the use of poetry. Perhaps it's not indispensable that every artist should do the same, but his way of narration is both visionary and informative. Marius, who graduated from the University of Santo Tomas in 2007, took up Fine Arts and majored in painting. He was conflicted between painting and comics but knew that he could execute both simultaneously. His fifth solo show Manila Synesthesia debuted on-site and virtually at Altro Mondo last July 31st to Aug