Monday, July 4

Culture

Artlets talk about political volunteerism

Artlets talk about political volunteerism

Culture
House-to-house campaigns, mural paintings, and collateral distribution under harsh weather are examples of acts done by political volunteers. They go to the streets, carrying a cause with them and standing for what they believe in.   Proven to be a critical sector, the Filipino youth nowadays inspires and enacts their political ideology through the conduct of political volunteerism. This is the case for Artlets Paulo Manuel and Martin Alcantara who stood on their beliefs and served as volunteers for the campaign period during the recently-held national elections.  What it means to be a political volunteer Manuel, the president of  UST Concilium Philosophiae for Academic Affairs and former volunteer for Chel Diokno, defined a ‘volunteer’ as an individual who "does something
Three things you need to know to be election-ready

Three things you need to know to be election-ready

Culture
SOCIAL MEDIA is now a major platform for expressing political views and promoting causes. However, relying solely on the internet for election-related information is never adequate, even risky.   Young voters need to cut through the clutter of social media and prepare for the coming elections, a crucial event that will shape the direction of the Philippines as it seeks to recover from the pandemic.  After all, their decisions in the polling precincts will likely have a lasting impact on practically every aspect of their life.    How can the youth, especially first-time voters, be election ready?  Know thy political landscape Legal management junior Claudine Joanna Imperial and communication junior Jose Paulo Ryan Joson said they familiarize themselves with the political
Barok in focus: What to see in Art Fair PH’s project section

Barok in focus: What to see in Art Fair PH’s project section

Culture
By PAULINE JOYCE C. PASCUAL NOTHING is more life-affirming than acquiring an appreciation for the arts, and the new normal is the season for trying out new experiences. Quarantine rules have eased, and Filipinos are eager to engage in activities that were previously halted during the pandemic's peak.  Art Fair Philippines is no exception, as it resumed highlighting the best and brightest of the contemporary Philippine art scene.  The country's premier exhibit, a promoter of the strength of modern and contemporary Philippine visual art, returned for its 10th edition with a hybrid experience from March 23 to April 1 that included physical exhibitions at Ayala Triangle Gardens and gallery venues, as well as online exhibitions and other activities at artfairphilippines.com. One of
Award-winning Filipina sci-fi writers to read on Women’s Month

Award-winning Filipina sci-fi writers to read on Women’s Month

Culture
By HAZEL N. CAMBA FINDING FEMALE writers on the science fiction shelves nowadays would not even be a surprise, unlike the old times.  For the past decades, science fiction has been a male-dominated genre, with more men bagging recognizable awards like Hugo and being included in the list of “best-selling” science fiction. Today, an increasing number of women have successfully built their names in the genre, where they finally dominated Hugo awards for two consecutive years. In celebration of Women’s Month, The Flame rounds up the names of the Filipina sci-fi writers you might want to add to your "must-read" list.  1. Kristine Ong Muslim Fiction and poetry author Kristine Ong Muslim grabbed honorable mentions in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror, and got nominated for the
Artlet in business: A hometown cafe in Isabela

Artlet in business: A hometown cafe in Isabela

Culture
  NEARLY all businesses have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The ongoing health crisis caused mass lay-offs and closures, putting nations in economic shock. However, this did not stop small business owners from finding ways to survive and thrive. Artlet alumna Clarice Bernardo, the founder and co-owner of Karruba Cafe, is an exemplar of this. Karruba Cafe is a booming home and coffee shop located in Isabela province. Bernardo bravely took the risk of starting her own business despite the odds stacked against her. Karruba is the Ilocano word for neighbor or neighborhood. It serves as the foundation of what Karruba Cafe aims to offer: extending their home cafe within an arm's reach in their community, despite the strict health protocols. After its launch in June ...
The art of thriving: Embracing challenges through art

The art of thriving: Embracing challenges through art

Culture
by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO THE PREVIOUS years of isolation may have brought Filipinos time to ponder new realizations and meaning in their lives. In those years, the presence of anxiety and fear were felt in different situations. Their despondency may be caused by pandemic adversaries: sickness, death of a loved one, political chaos, financial distress, or mental illness. However, human beings also have the capacity to overcome these challenges. This was visualized by Jayson Cortez in his art exhibit titled ‘Revisioning The Breakout After Despondency.’ Cortez, whose collection centers on victory and growth amid struggles, shared how he became optimistic despite his own familial challenges. “I think it’s so important to be optimistic during these times. That’s the baby step
21 Notable Stories of 2021

21 Notable Stories of 2021

Culture
The Flame recaps 21 highlights of the second pandemic year: 1. Delta and Omicron variants spook Filipinos The Delta and Omicron variants were among the new COVID-19 variants that spread more quickly than other strains. The first Omicron variant cases in the Philippines were detected from two incoming travelers, a returning overseas Filipino from Japan and a Nigerian national. The World Health Organization classified Omicron as a variant of concern after discovering that it has several mutations that could affect the transmissibility of the virus and the severity of the disease. 2. Candidates file COC for 2022 polls Filipinos started to feel the heated election season when aspirants for national and local elective posts for next year’s polls filed their certificates of c
Enliven the Christmas spirit with resourceful decorations

Enliven the Christmas spirit with resourceful decorations

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA THE START of Paskuhan is usually marked by the illuminating of Christmas decorations.  From glittering lights and intricate ornaments to the towering Christmas tree in the University’s grandstand, these decorations are what make the Paskuhan event more enjoyable, said Andrew Joseph Chanco, a Theology instructor. “The different themes of the decorations displayed around the campus make the people feel the vibes of the Christmas season [...] it makes the Thomasian experience more memorable,'' he told The Flame. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic struck, and for two long years, Thomasian students were unable to delight in the University’s decorations.  Despite this stress-filled situation, it’s not too late to enliven the Christmas spirit. You
Thomasian tales: Flashbacks on pre-pandemic Paskuhan moments

Thomasian tales: Flashbacks on pre-pandemic Paskuhan moments

Culture
RECOGNIZED as the most anticipated annual event for every Thomasian since 1991, the University's Paskuhan marks its 30th year with the theme ‘The Pilgrimage: Our road through trials, our road through triumph.’ The University invites Thomasians in its second virtual Paskuhan this year. The chief-of-staff of the University of Santo Tomas - Central Student Council Gilbert Estropia Jr. said that last year’s Paskuhan presented recordings of programs but the performances this year will be live on-site. “The University is really trying their best to produce programs that Thomasians will enjoy, but this year’s Paskuhan, we made it a point to make it on-site, where the bands and the production will perform live on campus,” Estropia told The Flame. Let’s look back on some of the favorit
Start a fruitful Christmas season with fruity drinks and desserts

Start a fruitful Christmas season with fruity drinks and desserts

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK R. MAGNO RANARA and THEA ANDREA C. MAGUERIANO A BOWL of fruits on a center table of a typical Filipino dining room not only adds vibrant colors to one's home but also becomes part of the Filipino food culture. In this time of yuletide season, fruits become staples of Filipino favorites, including buko salad, halo-halo, and even pineapples in macaroni salad. But if you do not know how to prepare this kind of delicacy, you can always opt to order healthy options for fruity desserts instead. A sweet and savory prism in a cup Despite being a Singaporean dessert shop, Nine Fresh guarantees that its fruit bowl menu will satisfy Pinoys’ sweet cravings. It is generous with its toppings of over 20 choices of beans, jellies, and black pearls. Its ingredients are