Wednesday, December 2

Culture

Sweet Treats For A Cause

Sweet Treats For A Cause

Culture
by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO TYPHOON ROLLY and Ulysses brought tragic wind and rain, leaving many residents and pets stuck on their rooftops and trapped in floodwaters.  Due to Filipinos' bayanihan, concerned citizens and groups who are willing to donate to the victims of the typhoon announced their donation drives through social media platforms.  However, it is imperative for sponsors and donors to identify which donation drive they plan to contribute to — especially since some use fake fundraising initiatives, names, and groups to get money from people. Aside from featuring and supporting online food businesses, The Flame provides a list of dessert shops that donate a portion of their earnings to the victims of typhoon Rolly and Ulysses through their chosen organization. To
How Filipinas Became Heroes During WWII

How Filipinas Became Heroes During WWII

Culture
by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO WARS took place in several nations and in different environments. Soldiers, families, reformers, and survivors were carrying values and beliefs of their own, with a hopeful perspective that their needs and aspirations would soon be met. They are the affirmation that history truly happened, and that they brought changes in society that can still be observed today. The people of the past have battled for the principles that concern not only their lives but also the lives of others. Indeed, wars have brought chaos and change, but above all, the aftermath of wars brought starvation and scarcity, especially during the Second World War in the 1940s. When war emerges, the government does not only need strong survivor instincts but faith that the Filipino ci...
Halloween In Our Hearts: Movies to watch when the clock ticks three

Halloween In Our Hearts: Movies to watch when the clock ticks three

Culture
by CHRISTINE JANINE T. CORTEZ and JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA IF ONLY we would take a moment to turn away from all the jingle and twinkle of the Christmas season, then we may realize that there is one other important holiday that needs to have its fair share of celebration. The month of October should be the time for chilling scares, eerie screams, and spooky customs. However, since the dawn of time, it has always been outshadowed by a more favored holiday. It is in the unspoken tradition of Filipinos to start celebrating Christmas as early as September. Colorful carols and festive songs permeate the streets in four long months. Perhaps the lack of love for Halloween is rooted in our religious conservativeness and that celebrating such a spine-chilling holiday may instill ...
Every Story is Worth Sharing

Every Story is Worth Sharing

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA A SINGLE page from a book holds a thousand thoughts that inspire readers to find their true selves and to overcome the battles they are facing. But stories can only serve that purpose if writers are brave enough to share them. In this year’s Philippine Readers and Writers Festival held from Sept. 28 to Oct. 4, ABS-CBN Books prepared “Why the World Needs to Hear Your Story,” an online panel discussion by young authors to help pluck out the seeds of self-doubt from budding writers and push them to wield their pens and write. Writers Binibining Mia, Zarah Louise, Marianne Mencias, and Mica Meñez gathered to give an hour-long talk encouraging up-and-coming writers to unlock stories out of their minds and let the world hear their thoughts. Overcom
Nurturing the coffee rapport within everyone

Nurturing the coffee rapport within everyone

Culture
words and photos by CHRISTINE JANINE T. CORTEZ and THEA ANDREA C. MAGUERIANO WITH the pandemic and its limitation on hosting events, The Flame celebrates International Coffee Day by joining the coffee craze with a short list of on-the-go coffee. The international event is celebrated to help coffee farmers earn income this year. The global coffee celebration was arranged by the International Coffee Organization (ICO), which aims to showcase coffee as a beverage and help people behind the warm cups every October 1. Mean Bean Flaunting their coffee drips and cold brew coffees sourced from Sagada and Kalinga, sisters Ara Mae Ayap and Thomasian alumna Kristene Ayap started Mean Bean last July to have extra income this pandemic. Kristene was the owner of Cafe Tomas at Padr...
Finding consciousness in the hums of isolation

Finding consciousness in the hums of isolation

Culture
by CHRISTINE JANINE T. CORTEZ FOR EVERY great defeat comes along a greater resurgence. It may not happen tomorrow or the day after that but like every other episode in a series of unfortunate events, eventually, things will make sense and all things will come to an end. Although it may seem that this pandemic has ended a lot of great opportunities, it is without a doubt that life must still go on. And in doing that, arduous but inevitable changes have to be made. Despite several changes in the industry, the creative people behind the Cultural Center of the Philippines, and the Museum Division, guaranteed seats for everyone as they unveiled this years' Cinemalaya film festival. They launched not one but two online events to celebrate the annual film festival. One of the two ...
Seeking Balance: Steadying One’s Self On Life’s Unstable Rope

Seeking Balance: Steadying One’s Self On Life’s Unstable Rope

Culture
by JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA “HOW DOES one find solid footing in a world and future that is suddenly more uncertain as ever?” This is the question viewers are asked when they click Seeking Balance: A Tumba-Tumba Proof-of-Concept Show — a virtual exhibit presented by the University of the Philippines (UP) Vargas Museum in collaboration with The Center for Art, New Ventures & Sustainable Development (CANVAS). Balance is an intangible concept that everyone seeks in their life. As new problems rise and spread around the world, it seems impossible for anyone to keep on their toes. Most have even lost their footing and succumbed to the dark depths below. To inspire people to get back on their feet, CANVAS had gathered 25 individual artists and four groups to explore the hardsh
Conquering Battles In Online Classes

Conquering Battles In Online Classes

Culture
by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO MILLIONS of silent complaints about online learning in the midst of a pandemic are bottled up at the back of each students’ mind—no worries about feeling alone in this struggle. Students and parents think that studying amid the pandemic is somehow inappropriate for various justifiable reasons. After overcoming the challenges of the last school year’s adjustments to continue the semester, however, students are now able to adapt to the online learning environment. Although other students have experienced homeschooling, some are not born with that kind of privilege, making it hard for them to adjust to the new way of education. Despite knowing how wearying the country’s problems today, Education Secretary Leonor Briones believes that education should
Artlets With Deep Pockets: Earning and Saving Money Amid The Pandemic

Artlets With Deep Pockets: Earning and Saving Money Amid The Pandemic

Culture
  by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO MONEY comes and goes—it doesn’t really stay long in one’s hands, but rather flies and shifts places or possessions from one person to another. And when talking about money, two impressions come to mind—earning and saving. Lack of “emergency money” pushes most people to commit poor decisions in handling their finances and resources in times of crisis. The absence of knowledge in financing is also another reason most people struggle in committing to saving their money.  People also think that it is easier to finance at a young age. But in today’s circumstances, many may have noticed that both adults and students face troubles when it comes to budgeting. It turns out that making money for students is not completely effortless and fulfill
Anting-anting: Alive or Forgotten?

Anting-anting: Alive or Forgotten?

Culture
words and photos by CHRISTINE JANINE CORTEZ IT IS not often that people of today will ever lay eyes, nor will they ever get a chance to witness an amorphous anting-anting; an inevitable reminder and a relic of a religious icon for protection, luck, and healing. Most might say it is absurd to even speak of it these days. It may be true, but not for the people who continue to believe. Some people even made an art out of it during a gallery exhibit curated by Norman Crisologo titled, Bulong at Sigaw: Mga Kontemporaryong Kulam, Dasal, Anting-anting, at Ritwal (Whisper and Prayer: Contemporary Witchcraft, Prayer, Anting-anting, and Rituals).  Held at Art Informal on Connecticut St., Greenhills East, Mandaluyong City. Together, the exhibit was made possible by Crisologo and 11 ot