Wednesday, January 23

Tag: Anti-Hazing Law

Stricter anti-hazing act signed into law

Stricter anti-hazing act signed into law

Scenes
By CRIS EUGENE T. GIANAN AN AMENDED version of the anti-hazing law, which now bans all forms of hazing, was signed by President Rodrigo Duterte on June 29 after an almost year-long debacle following the death of University of Santo Tomas Civil Law freshman Horacio Castillo III. Republic Act (R.A.) 11053 or the Anti-Hazing Act of 2018 prohibits “all forms of hazing [...] in fraternities, sororities, and organizations in schools including citizens’ military training and citizens’ army training.” The new law nullifies any waiver signed by the victim prior to the initiation rite, adding that “the defense that the recruit, neophyte, or applicant consented to being subjected to hazing shall not be available to persons prosecuted under this Act.” In addition, the new law imposes
Of Brotherhood, Bruises, and Blood: What’s next after Atio’s death by hazing?

Of Brotherhood, Bruises, and Blood: What’s next after Atio’s death by hazing?

Issues
WHEN HE entered the gates of the University of Santo Tomas (UST) and walked past the Arch of the Centuries, Communication Arts junior Alexander Guevarra was convinced he was safe within the walls of the campus. “Akala ko ‘yung UST, safe space siya para sa lahat, [a] harm-free environment.” But now, Guevarra no longer sees UST as a top-of-the-line institution, all the more as one of the finest Catholic universities in the country after the fatal hazing case of Civil Law freshman and Political Science alumnus Horacio “Atio” Castillo III. On Sept. 17, Castillo was declared dead on arrival at the Chinese General Hospital, following the “welcoming rites” of Civil Law-based fraternity Aegis Juris that he attended a day before. Aegis Juris member and suspectturned-state-witness Mark