Wednesday, September 28
Shadow

Tag: horror

Dream Walker: A peek into the process of Noel Layon Flores

Dream Walker: A peek into the process of Noel Layon Flores

Culture
WHILE THE story is important, visuals are usually what hook readers. The haunting and unsettling paths remain in their memory. Horror comic books are usually designed to warn about things that go bump in the night — things that are unknown. Dream Walker, a horror fiction comic book, was created and written by Filipino-American writer Mikey Sutton and international visual artist Noel Layon Flores. They started creating the series in 2019 and eventually got published in February 2021. It can be purchased online via the Second Skin Comics website.  The story revolves around Kat, a survivor of a tragic bus accident in Pampanga that killed women and children. After the incident, she learns she can steal items from people's dreams and use them to combat monsters and demons. “Inspir...
Horror films may serve as a coping mechanism, experts say

Horror films may serve as a coping mechanism, experts say

News
by JANIS JOPLIN G. MOISES and VANESSA NORIKO S. YAP HORROR MAY not always be a breeze to watch as it can bring traumas and other mental health issues to some, but in other cases, watching these kinds of films can be a way to release emotions that cannot be expressed in real life. Zachia Domingo, a behavioral science sophomore, said horror films helped her process suppressed emotions. “Horror films affected my mental health in a positive way since it helped me get a lot of emotions out of my system,” Domingo said. English Language Studies sophomore Joyce Estrella said watching horror movies has helped tap into her feelings and experience stronger emotions during a dull day. Estrella and Domingo admitted that horror films provide excitement and thrill rather than fright be...
Halloween In Our Hearts: Movies to watch when the clock ticks three

Halloween In Our Hearts: Movies to watch when the clock ticks three

Culture
by CHRISTINE JANINE T. CORTEZ and JOHN PATRICK A. MAGNO RANARA IF ONLY we would take a moment to turn away from all the jingle and twinkle of the Christmas season, then we may realize that there is one other important holiday that needs to have its fair share of celebration. The month of October should be the time for chilling scares, eerie screams, and spooky customs. However, since the dawn of time, it has always been outshadowed by a more favored holiday. It is in the unspoken tradition of Filipinos to start celebrating Christmas as early as September. Colorful carols and festive songs permeate the streets in four long months. Perhaps the lack of love for Halloween is rooted in our religious conservativeness and that celebrating such a spine-chilling holiday may instill ...