Saturday, February 4
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Tag: K-pop

Fandoms in war: Are they going too far?

Fandoms in war: Are they going too far?

Culture
Note: This article mentions suicide, death threats and toxic behaviors.  AFTER DEFENDING a K-pop artist by replying to comments to a Twitter hate post, Polytechnic University of the Philippines biology senior Seth Niño Paparon was mobbed by several fan accounts. Online attacks on K-pop groups, Paparon said, usually happen during their most notable events like awards nights and talent show awardings, and reading such hate comments is indeed hard to ignore. “I’m just opposing everything that the fans of other groups claimed or those statements that are thrown at us,” Paparon said.  Since he uses his personal account, most of the comments targeted his physical appearance. “It (personal comment) does not bother me, but the hate comments targeted at my idols such as Taeyeon’s...
K-Pop culture can create a new internationalism—cultural studies prof

K-Pop culture can create a new internationalism—cultural studies prof

News
The rise of Korean pop (K-pop) boy group BTS has revealed a possible “new internationalism” as fans associate themselves with their idols while expressing their views on social issues, a cultural studies professor said. Kyung Hee University professor Alex Taek-Gwang Lee said BTS member Park Jimin’s issue in Tokyo Dome proved the potential clout of the group’s fans who engage in social issues while promoting unity and belongingness. “It would be true that BTS fans voluntarily participate in any social issue and a political agenda under the name of BTS supporters... They use BTS as a chance to practice global solidarity and to recognize transnational citizenship with this kind of activity,” Alex said during a lecture on K-pop and nationalism last Friday. Park sparked controversy whe...