Friday, January 28

Tag: Martial Law

Artlets told to hold dialogues with deniers of Martial Law abuses

Artlets told to hold dialogues with deniers of Martial Law abuses

Scenes
by ARTHUR N. APOSTOL ARTLETS SHOULD engage in dialogue instead of acting as agents of cancel culture, especially on discussions about Martial Law, a community development expert said. Tyrone Nepomuceno, UST-Simbahayan Community Development coordinator, said people should promote a culture of dialogue with the deniers of the Martial Law abuses as individuals hold different experiences during the era. “It could be good for some, but it could be bad for others, we need to listen to both the positive and negative sides,” Nepomuceno said during the 'Martial Law Balik-Balikan: A Webinar on Historical Distortion and Fact-Checking of Martial Law Resources' last Nov. 18. However, the fact that several Filipinos were victimized during Martial Law should not be overlooked, Nepomuceno
Professorial Chair holder: Never forget Martial Law

Professorial Chair holder: Never forget Martial Law

Scenes
FILIPINOS MUST remember what happened during Martial Law as forgetting or denying the abuses during the period is a form of silencing its victims, a multi-awarded scholar said. Prof. Joyce Arriola, holder of the Teodoro F. Valencia Professorial Chair in Journalism, noted that an avalanche of information and the plurality of opinions are competing with the truth behind the Martial Law narrative. “Some of this information may be true, but some are also false. [Forgetting as an] annulment is done by flooding the market with information, which led to confusion and the muting of the essential story,” Arriola said during her professorial lecture last Nov. 13. Arriola, also the director of the Research Center for Culture, Arts, and the Humanities, said values such as truth, justice,
Thomasian Debaters Council to hold symposium on Martial Law

Thomasian Debaters Council to hold symposium on Martial Law

Scenes
THE THOMASIAN Debaters Council (TDC), the official debate varsity of the University of Santo Tomas (UST), will be holding “Diskursong Tomasino: The Martial Law Chapter,” a symposium on the various aspects of Martial Law in relation to present-day events on March 11. “Contemporary events prove how relevant it is to educate our students with what has really happened in the past. […] I think it's important and it's about time that we give faces to the stories that we keep on hearing in order for our students to relate and really understand them,” TDC president Bianca Lacaba told the Flame in an online exchange. The speakers include Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism executive director Malou Mangahas, former Commission on Human Rights chairperson Etta Rosales, Hilda Narci
Thomasians urged to take a stand vs. Martial Law

Thomasians urged to take a stand vs. Martial Law

Scenes
“[THE DECLARATION of Martial Law] can happen, but only if you let it happen. ‘Pag pinabayaan niyong mangyari, ‘pag ‘di kayo kumilos, mangyayari.” This was the challenge of anti-Martial Law advocates to Thomasians in a forum held Feb. 24 in commemoration of the 31st anniversary of the EDSA Revolution. Ana Elzy Ofreneo, Commission on Human Rights director for human rights promotion, said the youth should remember and act against what transpired during the Martial Law period, which she claimed to be a “horrible experience to everyone.” “Tyrants rule when the people are meek and silent. Marcos […] showed that [Martial Law] does not work as a model for development because as the saying goes, ‘absolute power corrupts absolutely,’” Ofreneo said. The youth played an important role
Students, protesters hold Duterte liable for Marcos’ burial at LNMB

Students, protesters hold Duterte liable for Marcos’ burial at LNMB

Scenes
LIGHT RAINS did not dampen the rage of protesters over the burial of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos Sr. at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LMNB). The Filipinos who gathered at the Quirino Grandstand in what was dubbed as the "National Day of Unity and Rage” also held President Rodrigo Duterte liable for allowing the burial. Former Bayan Muna Rep. Neri Colmenares said Duterte had the choice to grant or disapprove the hero’s burial because no law states that Marcos should be buried at LNMB but only under the regulations of the Armed Forces of the Philippines. “Reconciliation? Paano tayo magkaroon ng reconciliation kung ni hindi in-a-acknowledge ng mga Marcos na may human rights violations at may plunder noong Martial Law […] at kung hindi ibalik ang bilyun-bilyong nakaw na yaman
Handang Lumaban

Handang Lumaban

Perspectives
Editor’s Note: In line with the 44th anniversary of the declaration of Proclamation 1081 as the law of the land, the Flame will post a series of articles written by the publication’s former staffers during the Martial Law period. The Flame, being one of the student publications who continued its fearless reportage during those tumultuous times, believes that we—both the young and the old—should never turn a blind eye and forget the atrocities and plunders during Martial Law. It is our duty as members of the press to enlighten the Filipinos about that dark period in the country’s history. (This article was originally published in The Flame Vol. 13, No. 1 issue) SUMIBOL ANG binhi ng aktibismo noong 1970 na naging dahilan ng pagdedeklara ng “Martial Law” sa ating bansa. Dito n
Panahon na, Bayan

Panahon na, Bayan

Letters
Editor’s Note: In line with the 44th anniversary of the declaration of Proclamation 1081 as the law of the land, the Flame will post a series of articles written by the publication’s former staffers during the Martial Law period. The Flame, being one of the student publications who continued its fearless reportage during those tumultuous times, believes that we—both the young and the old—should never turn a blind eye and forget the atrocities and plunders during Martial Law. It is our duty as members of the press to enlighten the Filipinos about that dark period in the country’s history. (This poem was originally published in The Flame Vol. 13, No. 1 issue) Ang bulok na lipunan ay saan nga ba nanggaling, Ano ba ang naging sanhi’t tayo ngayo’y nasa dilim? Ni anino ng buhay
An Echo from the Past: the Remains of Martial Law

An Echo from the Past: the Remains of Martial Law

Culture
ON SEPT. 21, 1972, then president Ferdinand Marcos signed Proclamation No. 1081 and rendered the state under armed control. This declaration resulted to around 107,240 human rights violations, which left a horrendous mark on the nation. Stories of the horrors of the period are retold every year. But millennials—who were too young to have experienced or remember the bloody era—continue to show apathy, while the preceding generation appears to have forgotten. The Sound of Silence: Remembering Martial Law is an eye-opening exhibit featuring the works of Edgar “Egai" Talusan Fernandez. Here are some of the pieces which invoke the various dimensions of the oppressive period: Pandora ng Karunungan, a black and white painting, presents a head whose temple has a flicked off switch, a
The Language of Protest

The Language of Protest

Perspectives
Editor's Note: In line with the 44th anniversary of the declaration of Proclamation 1081 as the law of the land, the Flame will post a series of articles written by the publication's former staffers during the Martial Law period. The Flame, being one of the student publications who continued its fearless reportage during those tumultuous times, believes that we—both the young and the old—should never turn a blind eye and forget the atrocities and plunders during Martial Law. It is our duty as members of the press to enlighten the Filipinos about that dark period in the country's history. (This editorial was originally published in The Flame Vol. 11, No. 1 issue) RECENT TRENDS show that the populace has finally been jolted into realizing the harsh realities that beset them.
Thomasians called on to revisit Martial Law history

Thomasians called on to revisit Martial Law history

Scenes
ANTI-MARTIAL LAW advocates exposed the atrocities committed during the rule of late dictator Ferdinand Marcos and appealed to Thomasians to revisit the "darkest era since World War II." Human rights lawyer and activist Neri Colmenares claimed that the government has not been providing the “right” information to the people, especially the millennials, for the past 30 years. “The government refused the younger generation [the real stories] of Martial Law," Colmenares said in a forum titled Honor Thy President? held at the Benavides Auditorium. The former Bayan Muna party-list representative stressed that many of the Marcoses are still in the government and are gaining back the trust of the people years after the regime ended because of the historical revisionism in the textbooks