Thursday, May 26

Tag: UST AB Chorale

How the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters brings music in the new normal

How the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters brings music in the new normal

Features
by MARY NICOLE P. MIRANDA THE ARTLET experience would not be complete without the music of the UST Chorus of Arts and Letters (AB Chorale) echoing in the hallways of St. Raymund’s de Peñafort building at night.  With the musical beat of the choir conductor Mark Agpasa, hearing the harmonization of the choir became a huge part of the Artlet culture—bringing color and life to their listeners. However, with the sudden shift of events as the university shifted to online learning, the harmony of AB Chorale was tested tremendously due to limitations in rehearsing in person.  Despite such restrictions, the rhythm of AB Chorale continues to play with a much deeper purpose. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_GUrZtHSHY Members turned family From simple talks and bondings between
Rekindling Christmas Joy with Himig ng Pasko

Rekindling Christmas Joy with Himig ng Pasko

Culture
by SAMANTHA ARGONZA   ENTERING a new decade challenged by numerous natural calamities and a pandemic temporarily halting live events, Artlets have redefined their concept of home as the yuletide season is now fast approaching.  In an attempt to restrengthen the value of home, UST Chorus of Arts and Letters (AB Chorale), along with other five choirs, united in harmony during a virtual Christmas presentation last December 1 titled Himig ng Pasko: Paskong Pasko Na Talaga. AB Chorale collaborated with pioneer members from UST Senior High School Chorale, Marriage Encounter Foundation of the Philippines Chorale South Cluster, Lagablab ng Espiritu Santo Chorale, and Pag-IBIG Fund Chorale. Overseeing this by their musical director, Mark Raeniel Agpasa, the event greeted Art
Banyuhay: A Magnification of the Filipino Society

Banyuhay: A Magnification of the Filipino Society

Literary
TRAIN RIDES are oftentimes tiresome because of the lengthy lines at ticket stations, the immersion with a huge pack of commuters, the noisy clanking of the wheels with the rail tracks, and the grasping of steel posts as one stands impatiently waiting for the train to arrive at his destination. However, Banyuhay shows it as a more significant notion. Nine different passengers enchained by various burdens in life board the same locomotive. As the vehicle passes by four stations (C. Bulan, Balaquid, Muntican and Katuparan), its passengers vent their frustrations about the irksome experience of riding the train and their troubles at work. One by one, they earn the spotlight—emotionally disclosing their stories and finalizing each of their statements by admitting what they feel inside. T