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Tag: Vaccines

Medical martial law? Debating with critics of COVID-19 vaccination pointless, says expert

Medical martial law? Debating with critics of COVID-19 vaccination pointless, says expert

Features
WHILE PEOPLE have the right to free expression, those who staged the Liwasang Bonifacio protest against mandatory vaccination last January were arrested or were bombed with water cannons.  However, the individuals who protested against what they called “medical martial law” were dispersed not for expressing what is now an unconventional view but for violating quarantine protocols. According to the police, the protesters, which numbered about 150 people,  refused to wear face masks or present their vaccination cards, violating city ordinances and minimum health protocols set by the government.  But for JJ Villanueva, the dispersal was inconsistent with the freedom of speech guaranteed to Filipinos.  “They told us we had every right to express our opinions, and [then] one day th...
Shooting the shot: Addressing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among Filipinos

Shooting the shot: Addressing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among Filipinos

Issues
by MATTHEW DAVE JUCOM and BLESS AUBREY OGERIO THE GOVERNMENT has sought to vaccinate at least 70 percent of its total population to achieve herd immunity—the perceived solution against the untamed pandemic—when mass COVID-19 vaccination started last March. From March to September, a total of 21.3 million Filipinos or 19.59 percent of the whole Philippine population were fully vaccinated against COVID-19.  Meanwhile, 24.2 million Filipinos or 22.23 percent of the whole Philippine population received their first dose of vaccine.  However, widespread misinformation and controversies regarding vaccines still lurk on the internet, prompting several Filipinos to refuse to get inoculated. This is a roadblock in the government’s goal of achieving herd immunity.  Among them is Ca...
The waiting game: Thomasians outside Metro Manila still seeking access to COVID-19 jabs

The waiting game: Thomasians outside Metro Manila still seeking access to COVID-19 jabs

Issues, The Flame Explains
THE UNIVERSITY of Santo Tomas (UST) has become one of  Manila's vaccination sites, giving Thomasians and their families—Manileño or not—access to what everyone hopes will end the pandemic. But for students residing in the province, the means to travel and the quarantine protocols in the Philippine capital pose a problem. This leaves Thomasians far from school with no choice but to play the waiting game.  Among them is Maxine Rae Joaquin, a third year communication arts student from Ilocos Norte who remains unvaccinated since her local government is still administering jabs to the priority groups.  Because of the limited vaccine supply, the government prioritized health workers, senior citizens, persons with comorbidities, essential workers, and the indigent population, sectors tha...