Tuesday, June 25

Tag: Artistang Artlets

Sa Muling Pagkikita: No Comfort in Closure

Sa Muling Pagkikita: No Comfort in Closure

Letters
By CORHEINNE JOYCE B. COLENDRES IN THE grand scale of certain journeys, one will always feel a specific kind of ease in finally figuring out the finality of things. No matter how tasking, however, people easily forget the importance of the process and the journey itself; instead, they like to focus on the results, on the ending. Some find it more comforting to be able to reach the destination without actually taking the entire route. Despite this, one must realize that some endings are never truly uplifting. Directed by Robert Villanueva and Fenichi Lozada and staged by Likhang Laya in partnership with Artistang Artlets, Sa Muling Pagkikita features an anthology of plays that proves how reaching the end of a journey does not always provide the necessary conclusion—how we do not alway
Cleaners: Art against Oppression

Cleaners: Art against Oppression

Letters
By RYAN PIOLO U. VELUZ FROM the arid scrubs stroking the surface of the dusty floor, a strident sound shrouds the quarters of Ms. Dimaguiba’s classroom. Heightened by the boisterous conversation of the cleaners, the room transforms into an arena of juvenile arguments and mischievous plays. However, the blaring echoes are suddenly muted when the cadavers are exposed from the classroom’s cupboard. Written and directed by Jhudiel Clare Sosa, Cleaners is a play about a group of students and their regular cleaning sessions that turn into a plan on how to eliminate the biggest dirt in their classroom: the corpses of their classmates. After discussing possible methods to effectively solve the problem, Irish and her friends decide that they must address the root of the bloodshed by killi
Artistang Artlets’ Pendulum: A Review

Artistang Artlets’ Pendulum: A Review

Letters
TIME IS the indefinite continued progression of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. However, Pendulum seeks to let the audience think otherwise. Fascinated by the concept of time, writer Rani Mae Aberin attempted to reconcile Cronus, the god of time in Greek mythology, with the modern era. She revealed a god who intervenes with the linear motion of time. He halts time and allows the past to catch up. As he trains a student to be his rightful heir, the next in line to help the mortals proceed to the future, he was in awe by the struggles of the youth faces today. The play had three settings carefully arranged in one spacious stage with the mood set through stage lighting. Any change of color and the