Wednesday, January 23

Tag: Cinema One Originals

Breaking the Barriers of Disparity in ‘Mamu (And a Mother Too)’

Breaking the Barriers of Disparity in ‘Mamu (And a Mother Too)’

Letters
By RYAN PIOLO U. VELUZ ONCE the sun sets to take its respite, Mamu (Iyah Mina) faces the mirror and starts her usual routine: she highlights her face with cosmetics and dresses up to reveal her fair skin through seductive choices in apparel and various accessories. She then dominates the red-light district Fields Avenue in Angeles City, enticing flocks of foreigners to avail of her best product: her flesh. Mamu (And a Mother Too) is the debut entry of director and LGBTQ+ rights advocate Rod Singh to this year’s Cinema One Originals film festival. The film discusses the sacrifices and hardships in the life of a middle-aged transgender woman who roams around the city in search of pleasure seekers to offer her services to as a sex worker. Mamu’s life was simple and predictable u
Paki: Starting Anew Despite Old Age

Paki: Starting Anew Despite Old Age

Letters
By KRIZIA MAICA G. MAGBITANG AN UNPLEASANT fact in the Filipino society is how common it is for men to commit adultery and how women turn a blind eye. One particular article even remarked at the increasing infidelity rates of married Filipino males and the justification of their act by saying it supplements a man’s machismo. One of the Cinema One Originals 2017 film entry, Paki, takes on this social issue in a contemporary setting and bags the Best Picture and Best Director awards. The main character, Molina (Dexter Doria), has had enough of putting up with her husband’s womanizing ways. She leaves her home and, for once, stands up on her own even though her family does not approve of this decision. The film’s title, Paki, is translated into two words, “please” and “care,” and it
Unravelling Ghosts’ Forgotten Battles in Haunted: A Last Visit to the Red House

Unravelling Ghosts’ Forgotten Battles in Haunted: A Last Visit to the Red House

Letters
By CORHEINNE JOYCE B. COLENDRES THE ILUSORIO family owned a beautiful two-story mansion that was surrounded by large gardens filled with tropical plants and flowers. The mansion stood out like a ruby gem in a sea of greenery. However, upon the Japanese occupation, the Red House turned into a sight of terror and trauma. The family mansion has long lost its luster—instead, it became a haunted house full of the ghosts of the women who became victims of the atrocities of the Japanese army. Haunted: A Last Visit to the Red House explores the lives of the surviving members of the Malaya Lola, a group that was formed by former comfort women who were taken in by the Japanese soldiers during their occupation in the Philippines. The story is woven through retelling the accounts and experie
Throwback Today: In Memory of a Timeless Virtue

Throwback Today: In Memory of a Timeless Virtue

Letters
By MARIA ANTOINETTE A. MALICSE THE PRESENT moment is actually comprised of different—though perhaps not equally—sorts of variables that determine it, some of which each individual are ultimately responsible for, while others beyond his/her control. In the Cinema One Originals entry “Throwback Today,” director Joseph Teoxon makes use of time travel as instrument to edify the timeless virtue of becoming conscious of the consequences of one’s decisions, that no matter how irrelevant it may seem, every crossroad one will encounter in his/her life is still a crossroad. Through its protagonist Primo Jose Lacson (Carlo Aquino), the viewers are reminded that a single turn taken or missed can ultimately affect how long before someone reaches his/her destination if he/she will even make it