Friday, June 25

Tag: Elections

HSTSOC elects new executive board, promotes ‘open fund drive’

HSTSOC elects new executive board, promotes ‘open fund drive’

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by MARIE CLAIRE LAGRISOLA and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM NEWLY-ELECTED Executive Board officers are set to lead the UST History Society (HSTSOC) for the next academic year (AY), History Society - Commission on Elections (HSTSOC Comelec) announced Monday evening. History sophomore Joel Benedict Cabo will lead the History Society as its next president after securing votes from 15 districts. Cabo believes that there is a need to provide sufficient student support and representation. "It seems that there has been a lack of the said services [student support and representation] from the societies these days due to the challenges posed by the pandemic, but I do not blame the current executive board at all. They have tried in the best of their capabilities, despite taking the blow," Cabo t...
LAYA candidates secure positions in TPSF

LAYA candidates secure positions in TPSF

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by JENNA KAYE M. PANDANAN and ARTHUR N. APOSTOL MEMBERS OF the Lakas ng Alyansang Yaman ay Aksyon (LAYA) party were proclaimed as winners in The Political Science Forum’s (TPSF) regular elections for the academic year 2021-2022, the UST-TPSF Comelec announced Wednesday. The LAYA members were the only students who filed for candidacy in the election. President-elect junior Paul Derick Olorga with 186 votes aims to conduct "Live, Learn, Lead,” a three-day seminar that will focus on students' growth and the improvement of their learning.  Olorga also promoted “LUALHATI,” which aims to highlight the history of TPSF, and Talakayan, a two-part program for the upcoming 2022 elections to inform and a two-part program to inform and discuss the candidates for the upcoming 2022 elections.
Sophomores to lead JournSoc, plans to work on journ identity

Sophomores to lead JournSoc, plans to work on journ identity

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by MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM ALL FOUR independent sophomore candidates have secured their spot for the Executive Board of the UST Journalism Society (JournSoc) for the academic year 2020-2021. Marymon Frances Reyes will lead the Journalism Society as the next president after securing 182 votes with 40 abstain in this year’s poll.  “Running for presidency is more than [the idea of] having 10 months to work, it's working with what you have and working with it the best way you can,” Reyes said on term limitations.  Jessie Jayms Rival won the position of secretary with 176 votes while 46 journalism students who did not cast their votes. With 184 votes, Marsella Yvonne Sy will be the next treasurer of JournSoc. Thirty-eight students did not vote.  Aubrey Sto. Tomas was proclai
JournSoc poll pushes through amid COVID-19

JournSoc poll pushes through amid COVID-19

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by RIENE R. DIMAKILING and MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM the official list of candidates grabbed from the Facebook account of UST-Journalism Society. THE ELECTION for new Executive Board (EB) members of the UST Journalism Society would push through despite the shift to online platforms due to the coronavirus pandemic, the JournSoc’s Board of Elections (BOE) announced on Nov. 10.  Four sophomore students are vying for top positions this year. Marymon Frances Reyes, anchor for the UST Tiger TV and former production committee member of JournSoc, is running for president, with “creating change in preparation for the future” through student security and inclusivity on decision-making processes as her platform.  Jessie Jayms Rival, JournSoc’s former executive associate to the public relat
‘Raise election standards’ – educator, lay leader

‘Raise election standards’ – educator, lay leader

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  LITERATURE Department head Dr. Joselito delos Reyes urged Thomasians to raise their standards in choosing who to vote in the upcoming midterm elections in a voter education forum held Tuesday. Delos Reyes compared the stringent process of selecting professors to the lax selection of candidates. “Halimbawa, kami dito sa UST, bago maging propesor, dapat mayroon kaming masters; dapat may maayos kaming moral fiber; dapat may NBI clearance kami na kami ay walang kasong kinakaharap, kung meron man ay dapat tapos na. Ang taas ng standard e, ‘di ba… pero bakit sa pulitiko ang baba ng standard natin?” he said. Ricky Xavier, leader of a Christian political movement, stressed that voters should choose candidates for their integrity more than their credentials. “Kailanga
Manual voting a way to fair elections, says AB Comelec chair

Manual voting a way to fair elections, says AB Comelec chair

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THE DECISION of the UST Central Commission on Elections (Comelec) to revert to manual voting and canvassing for this year’s central and local student council elections could prevent the problems encountered in the previous polls, the chairperson of Faculty of Arts and Letters (AB) Comelec said. “I think that the Central Comelec’s decision is appropriate given the issue that happened last year,” Maria Margarita Villarica told the Flame in an online exchange. “We are doing the necessary precautions in order to secure honest and just elections for the students.” In a statement released online last Feb. 6, Central Comelec said that switching to manual voting and canvassing was deemed “best and necessary” and assured Thomasians that “the integrity and safety of the ballots are taken i
THE FLAME EXPLAINS: Are Voting Receipts Necessary?

THE FLAME EXPLAINS: Are Voting Receipts Necessary?

Issues, The Flame Explains
  AFTER THE Supreme Court (SC) affirmed its ruling for the Commission on Elections (Comelec) to issue voting receipts, the Philippines’ third fully automated national elections last May added the said feature in the voting process. But is it necessary? Section 6 of Republic Act 9369, also known as the Automated Election Law, requires a voter-verified audit paper trail (VVPAT), better known as the voting receipt. The VVPAT is a generic receipt printed on thermal paper that indicates the votes that the vote-counting machine (VCM) tallied for every ballot. It is given to voters for verification but it cannot be brought outside nor photographed. Should a voter have concerns, it should be raised to the Board of Election Inspectors. Asst. Prof. Dennis Coronacion, chairperson of