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Tag: Webinar

‘Business journalism a potent tool for telling stories of COVID-19 survival’

‘Business journalism a potent tool for telling stories of COVID-19 survival’

News
BUSINESS JOURNALISM is not just about reporting profits and number crunching but is also about telling the stories of the people hardest hit by the pandemic, business journalists said. Stories on pandemic response, the agriculture and labor sector, economic legislation, and election are best told by business journalists because they look at a broader context, Business Mirror editor-in-chief Lourdes Fernandez said. “From the get-go or the first quarter of 2020 with the pandemic reach Philippine shores, even the most seasoned science health journalists realized that telling the COVID-19 response story needed to be told as a business story,” Fernandez said during the ‘Beyond the Numbers: Understanding Business Journalism’ webinar held last Sept. 17. She cited a story by reporter ...
Gratitude, powerful antidote to health problems—psych researcher

Gratitude, powerful antidote to health problems—psych researcher

News
by JENNA KAYE PANDANAN and KAREN RENEE S. NOGOY Gratitude is a very powerful antidote to problems in well-being, said psychology researcher on Thursday in a webinar. “What we found [in our studies] was that gratitude was associated with better motivation, engagement, and achievement,” said Dr. Ronnel King, a psychology professor at the University of Macau and The Education University of Hong Kong, and co-founder and CEO of Positive Psychology and Education Association, Ltd. Digital storytelling which allows students to share their positive life stories by using online storytelling platforms like YouTube, Powtoon, and Storybird helps promote gratitude among students, King said. He furthers that exercises such as “counting blessings” and “tree of blessings” would help students re...
Increasing COVID-19 cases calls for ‘safer, better normal,’ BioChem prof says

Increasing COVID-19 cases calls for ‘safer, better normal,’ BioChem prof says

News
by MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM ‘SAFER NORMAL’ should be practiced through positive cooperation between the citizens and the government amid the increasing COVID-19 cases, UST Department of Biochemistry Leonardo Guevarra Jr. emphasized on Wednesday during a webinar. Guevarra urged the government to develop policies promoting cautious and progressive actions while practicing the imposed health protocols, as resiliency is an inefficient factor in battling the pandemic. He also advised the government to adapt to a ‘better normal’ by developing science-based policies and allocating more funding to science research and development.  “The problem with our government is that it only allocates 0.16 percent of its GDP (Gross Domestic Product) to research and development, while [other count...
Vaccine rollout needed for economy to recover — econ head

Vaccine rollout needed for economy to recover — econ head

News
by MARIE CLAIRE "BLANCHE" S. LAGRISOLA THE GOVERNMENT should have its citizens vaccinated to achieve the projected positive change in the economy, Faculty of Arts and Letters Economics Department Chair Carlos Manapat said on Monday in a webinar, UST Economic Outlook 2021: The Cost of our Choices. Manapat predicted a gross domestic product growth rate of 1.2 percent by the second quarter of 2022, but without the vaccination programs that will provide immunity to the citizens, he said that the economy cannot open abruptly. “The first step is to give the vaccines and later on open the economy,” Manapat said. The country started distributing vaccines on Monday with the arrival of 600,000 donated doses from China’s Sinovac, while more than 500,000 vaccine doses from AstraZeneca ...
Econ head urges Thomasians to help minimize pandemic effects

Econ head urges Thomasians to help minimize pandemic effects

News
by MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM AB ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT head Assoc. Prof. Carlos Manapat urged the Thomasian community to participate in the actions related to minimizing the adverse effects of the pandemic. “Find opportunities to volunteer like being contract tracers and attend to the needy [by donating] cash if you have, your time, and things that you don’t use and things that you don’t need but are still useful,” Manapat said during a webinar on Friday. “When the government said that the senior citizens [should not] go out, apektado talaga sila, especially, kung mag-asawang senior citizens. Now for us Thomasians, how can we help them? Well I think, in that case, a good example is we can go to their house and ask them if they need our help in buying groceries and medicine for examp...
ELSSOC explores Stylistics with academic experts

ELSSOC explores Stylistics with academic experts

News
By: ARTHUR APOSTOL and JENNA PANDANAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE Studies Society (ELSSOC) revisited the importance and essence of stylistics in literature through their recent event titled “STYLE LANG!: A webinar on Stylistics” on Wednesday. The event highlighted three experts from different universities in Metro Manila who shared their own interpretations and ideas on Stylistics in different areas. Lalaine Yanilla-Aquino, a professor from the University of the Philippines College of Arts and Letters, discussed the basics of Stylistics and how it is applied in literature. Aquino explained how Stylistics can be used for identifying the authors of the piece and finding different meanings in a literary piece. “Some theories claim that meaning is inherent in the text, but some theorie...
‘Weak institutions’ cause disinformation—journalist

‘Weak institutions’ cause disinformation—journalist

News
by KAREN RENEE S. NOGOY DISINFORMATION WORSENED amid pandemic and media is not to blame but the 'weak institutions,’ a journalist said in a webinar series spearheaded by third-year UST sociology students on Nov. 28. Ralf Rivas, a Rappler multimedia reporter, centered on the disinformation landscape during the pandemic and how it affects journalists in a webinar titled “In the Lens of Progress: A Forced Familiarity in Mass Media Amidst Pandemic.” “Badly crafted disinformation materials are mixed with the confusing ones, the partially true ones, and actually the legitimate ones,” said Rivas. He also said that “disinformation, weak institutions, profit-driven interest, competition, strongman leadership, climate of fear, and the virus” make up the country's “chaotic disinformat...
Pandemic limits students’ mobility, ‘necessary noise’—PolSci educators

Pandemic limits students’ mobility, ‘necessary noise’—PolSci educators

News
by MATTHEW DAVE A. JUCOM and MARIE CLAIRE "BLANCHE" S. LAGRISOLA POLITICAL SCIENCE educators have emphasized the challenges of mobility restrictions and the importance of students’ ‘necessary voice’ in dealing with the health crisis in a webinar conducted by the UST Department of Political Science last Nov. 23. Department of Political Science Asst. Prof. Louie Benedict Ignacio noted in his study “Mobility, Teens, and Quarantine: Covid-19’s Impact on the Mobility of Students and Young Individuals” that mobility restriction has a long term effect on personal, social, and economic characteristics of an individual. Ignacio said that it has compromised the students’ ‘sense of freedom’, an essential component for social development through constant engagement to others belonging in ...
How Filipinas Became Heroes During WWII

How Filipinas Became Heroes During WWII

Culture
by THERIZ LIZEL R. SILVANO WARS took place in several nations and in different environments. Soldiers, families, reformers, and survivors were carrying values and beliefs of their own, with a hopeful perspective that their needs and aspirations would soon be met. They are the affirmation that history truly happened, and that they brought changes in society that can still be observed today. The people of the past have battled for the principles that concern not only their lives but also the lives of others. Indeed, wars have brought chaos and change, but above all, the aftermath of wars brought starvation and scarcity, especially during the Second World War in the 1940s. When war emerges, the government does not only need strong survivor instincts but faith that the Filipino ci...
‘Laughter of dissent’ can spark resistance, history prof says

‘Laughter of dissent’ can spark resistance, history prof says

News
by JHONA R. VITOR photo grabbed from the official Facebook page of UST Department of History   THE LAUGHTER of dissent is not the only way to fight back, but the way to start fighting back, according to Filipino history professor and playwright Jose Victor Torres.  “[It] continues today as [socio-political] awareness grows in society; whether it will have a visible effect on the people is still a question,” Torres said during a webinar last Friday. He added that humor with political undertones can deliver a message to address the ills of society. “[When] laughter of dissent suddenly happens, it shows a warning that [people] are laughing at you, [and] you better watch out because the laughter might change into something else,” he said. As the country continues to g...