Saturday, September 19

Expressing circumstances through artistry in ManilArt 2015

photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN
photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN

ART PATRONS assembled at the SM Aura Convention Center last Oct. 8 to 11 to view this year’s ManilArt. With the theme “Raising the Philippine Colors on the World Stage,” the country’s longest-running art fair showcased and uplifted Filipino pride and talent through visual arts such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, and photography. Let us explore some favorites and see why ManilArt has continued to amaze audiences for seven years and counting:

 

photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL
photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL

1. Ferdinand Cacnio’s “Round and Round and Around We Go”

There is that sweet spot when one is childlike and jaded—not trying, but in a state of arrival. One flies but his movement is tempered with caution. It would be foolish to be careless but then there is lightness in not going through the motions. Ferdinand Cacnio’s “Round and Round and Around We Go” makes the audience stop and stare.

photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN
photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN

2. Lucky Salayog’s “My Working Routine”

“My Working Routine” glorifies the doer as a kinetic sculpture out of metal, abaca, stone, and resin. It depicts the beauty of repetition with the use of circular shapes and motion. Salayog proves why he is a legitimate “Ironman” as his signature style of making art out of junk materials is evident in this piece.

photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN
photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN

3. Karen D. Picadizo’s “Barrel Figure Shape”

Meanwhile, “Barrel Figure Shape” emanates fuzzy feelings with its femininity. Unlike other contemporary artists who portray serious and depressing messages in their works, Karen D. Picadizo chooses to put out a breath of fresh air. Her work shows that giving and openness make one’s heart full.

photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN
photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN

4. Demi Badua’s “In and Out Series”

The accidental construction of images prior to the textures conjured more images from the abstract of Demi Padua’s “In and Out Series.” It highlights the gray color scheme as it comes out as an explosion and a cry to the world to be more empathetic toward animals.

photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL
photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL

5. Patrick B. Fernandez’s “The Ballad of Mona Lisa (Life is not always a fairytale)”

 Patrick B. Fernandez flourishes a chronic Mona Lisa-inspired art in portraying a Filipina with darkened skin and fuller cheekbones. It signifies a young Filipina yearning to go to abroad. He illustrates his work with the use of wicked features to symbolize chaos in life.

photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL
photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL

6. Ramon Orlina’s “Bountiful Treasures”

 With his gifted hands, Ramon Orlina does not set his own freedom to experiment and create his visions into subsistence in “Bountiful Treasures.” With no influence and standards to follow, he devises his own style that demands originality, improvisation, and innovation.

photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN
photo by MICHELLE ANNE P. SOLIMAN

7. Lei Manto’s “King and Queen”

Lei Manto’s “King” and “Queen” illustrates a man and woman who depict their responsibilities in life. Manto believes that hardworking men and women must be hailed as kings and queens, with due admiration like royal families.

MANILA ART9
photo by KARL ANGELO N. VIDAL

8. Hermes Alegre and Justin Nuyda’s “Mindscape Search: Justin’s Angel”

Hermes Alegre and Justin Nuyda impressed spectators as they collaboratively explored and challenged the boundaries of the mind with “Mindscape Search: Justin’s Angel.” By incorporating depth and mystery on canvas, the abstract depicts women’s contributions to life and society. F JESSICA TINAO and JASMINE JOY ROSCELE P. SALANGA 

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