Wednesday, January 23

Tag: Metro Manila Film Festival

Deadma Walking: Opposing the Course of Destiny

Deadma Walking: Opposing the Course of Destiny

Letters
By CORHEINNE JOYCE B. COLENDRES WITH A year to live and an incurable illness that plagues him, John (Joross Gamboa) finally takes matters into his own hands. If destiny made the decision regarding the cause of his death, then he holds the decision on how he will die. He tells his best friend, Mark (Edgar Allan Guzman) about his elaborate plan to fake his own death. Mark feels conflicted about John’s plan, and asks John about what he hopes to hear at his own funeral. With his chin up and a clear disposition, John decides that he will encounter his own death—in a way that even destiny cannot steal from him. An entry to the Metro Manila Film Festival (MMFF) 2017, the film adaptation of a Palanca award-winning script of the same name tackles the friendship of two gay men who are
Ang Larawan: A Memento of a Moment in Time

Ang Larawan: A Memento of a Moment in Time

Letters
By MARIA ANTOINETTE A. MALICSE TO HAVE progress, there must be motion. However, the same can be said for regress, and so it seems that there is but a fine line between running away and moving forward. The key to distinguishing which from which is one’s relationship with his/her history. Through an audio-visual love letter to the Filipinos, the Obie Award winner and director Loy Arcenas echoes the significance of heritage, culture, and the arts to one’s life and their push-pull relationship with one’s growth and decline both as a nation and as an individual in his 2017 Metro Manila Film Festival Entry Ang Larawan—a musical theatric play based on National Artist for Literature Nick Joaquin’s three-act English play “A Portrait of the Artist as Filipino.” Set in a period before the o
JRN alumna’s Sunday Beauty Queen wins big in MMFF

JRN alumna’s Sunday Beauty Queen wins big in MMFF

Scenes
ARTLET ALUMNA'S Sunday Beauty Queen bagged four awards, including Best Picture, in the Metro Manila Film Festival (MMFF) 2016 Gabi ng Parangal held Dec. 29. The documentary directed by Journalism alumna Baby Ruth Villarama-Gutierrez also won Best Editing, Children’s Choice Award, and the Gatpuno Antonio J. Villegas Cultural Award, which is given to the film that best showcased the Filipino culture to the world. Sunday Beauty Queen follows the lives of domestic helpers in Hong Kong who spend their Sundays off participating in beauty pageants. The pageants help them uplift themselves and raise funds for overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) in need. Moreover, the documentary—first of its kind to compete in the annual film festival—featured the sacrifices done by OFWs for their famili
Seklusyon: The Wavering Nature of Man

Seklusyon: The Wavering Nature of Man

Letters
FILIPINOS ARE acquainted to evil and the supernatural from parables written in the Bible. It contains certain ethical standards that withstood the test of time, serving as a source of the nation’s belief systems. However, violence from an evil beyond the material plane is sometimes enough to shift the conviction of a faithful believer. It exudes even greater horror if evil is revealed to take a human form who resides with the living. Set in 1940s during the post-World War II era, Miguel (Ronnie Alonte) is introduced inside a church. He confesses his sins in preparation for his final test of faith before he is ordained as a priest. He travels to an isolated monastery to live with three other deacons to devote their time purely on fasting and deep prayer. In the span of seven days, al
Kabisera: The Filipino Society through a Mother’s Eyes

Kabisera: The Filipino Society through a Mother’s Eyes

Letters
IN THE Philippine cultural context, familialism is given utmost importance for it is the foundation of homes. At its core is the father, who thereby assumes the center seat of the dining table with his wife serving meals and the children sitting on either side. In Kabisera, the de Dios family serves as the quintessence of this notion—until a tragedy rattles the very core of it. The film opens with a celebration during New Year’s Eve, in which Tunying (Ricky Davao), Mercy (Nora Aunor), and their family feast on sumptuous meals laid before the table, and watch in awe the dazzling fireworks display outside. The scene that follows shows the family dining in their home, with all the members laughing at their own jokes. This perfection, however, is disturbed as the household is presented
Die Beautiful: As Colorful as Cosmetics

Die Beautiful: As Colorful as Cosmetics

Letters
WITH EVERY swish of the powder brush across Trisha’s face, and with every dab of lipstick on her lips, Barbs recalls all the significant moments her dear friend has lived through. Trisha Echevarria’s (Paolo Ballesteros) final wish to her best friend Barbs (Christian Bables) was that when she dies, she has to be dressed up like a certain celebrity every day on the week of her wake. She soon finishes applying her make-up, and the manager of the beauty contest finally calls her to appear on stage. Barbs is left gazing at her friend’s retreating figure. Trisha looks back, and Barbs sees what is probably her friend’s last genuine smile. Die Beautiful continues with this approach: the key point of each transition of the scenes is rooted from Trisha’s wake, and it stems out to give the
Saving Sally: Seeing Rarity in the Familiar

Saving Sally: Seeing Rarity in the Familiar

Letters
MANY FILMS labeled as “romantic” commonly include at least one of the characters directly saying the words “I love you” as it makes use of intimate physical contact between the couple to justify the concept of love in the story. Saving Sally, however, introduces a new take on the idea of romance by showing the incommunicability of the person’s feelings for his beloved. It presents how voicing out the supposedly simple three-word confession is made complicated, and thus, carries more depth as shown in the lover’s actions to communicate his love non-verbally. In the eyes of Marty (Enzo Marcos), an aspiring comic book artist, nothing is ever simple. Marty visualizes the world as if he were in a graphic novel, in which people are monsters and he himself being the hero of the story. Sall